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Glycosylation site occupancy in health, congenital disorder of glycosylation and fatty liver disease


Hülsmeier, Andreas J; Tobler, Micha; Burda, Patricie; Hennet, Thierry (2016). Glycosylation site occupancy in health, congenital disorder of glycosylation and fatty liver disease. Scientific Reports, 6:33927.

Abstract

Glycosylation is an integral part in health and disease, as emphasized by the growing number of identified glycosylation defects. In humans, proteins are modified with a diverse range of glycoforms synthesized in complex biosynthetic pathways. Glycosylation disorders have been described in congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) as well as in acquired disease conditions such and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). A hallmark in a subset of CDG cases is the reduced glycosylation site occupancy of asparagine-linked glycans. Using an optimized method protocol, we determined the glycosylation site occupancy from four proteins of hepatic and lymphatic origin from CDG and NAFLD patients. We found variable degrees of site occupancy, depending on the tissue of origin and the disease condition. In CDG glycosylation sites of IgG2 and IgA1 were occupied to normal levels. In NAFLD haptoglobin and transferrin glycosylation sites were hyper-glycosylated, a property qualifying for its use as a potential biomarker. Furthermore, we observed, that glycosylation sites of liver-originating transferrin and haptoglobin are differentially occupied under physiological conditions, a further instance not noticed in serum proteins to date. Our findings suggest the use of serum protein hyperglycosylation as a biomarker for early stages of NAFLD.

Abstract

Glycosylation is an integral part in health and disease, as emphasized by the growing number of identified glycosylation defects. In humans, proteins are modified with a diverse range of glycoforms synthesized in complex biosynthetic pathways. Glycosylation disorders have been described in congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) as well as in acquired disease conditions such and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). A hallmark in a subset of CDG cases is the reduced glycosylation site occupancy of asparagine-linked glycans. Using an optimized method protocol, we determined the glycosylation site occupancy from four proteins of hepatic and lymphatic origin from CDG and NAFLD patients. We found variable degrees of site occupancy, depending on the tissue of origin and the disease condition. In CDG glycosylation sites of IgG2 and IgA1 were occupied to normal levels. In NAFLD haptoglobin and transferrin glycosylation sites were hyper-glycosylated, a property qualifying for its use as a potential biomarker. Furthermore, we observed, that glycosylation sites of liver-originating transferrin and haptoglobin are differentially occupied under physiological conditions, a further instance not noticed in serum proteins to date. Our findings suggest the use of serum protein hyperglycosylation as a biomarker for early stages of NAFLD.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:11 October 2016
Deposited On:06 Jan 2017 14:32
Last Modified:01 Sep 2017 05:26
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2045-2322
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/srep33927
PubMed ID:27725718

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