Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Paleosols can promote root growth of recent vegetation - a case study from the sandy soil-sediment sequence Rakt, the Netherlands


Gocke, Martina; Kessler, Fabian; van Mourik, Jan M; Jansen, Boris; Wiesenberg, Guido L B (2016). Paleosols can promote root growth of recent vegetation - a case study from the sandy soil-sediment sequence Rakt, the Netherlands. SOIL, 2(4):537-549.

Abstract

Soil studies commonly comprise the uppermost meter for tracing, e.g., soil development. However, the maximum rooting depth of various plants significantly exceeds this depth. We hypothesized that deeper parts of the soil, soil parent material and especially paleosols provide beneficial conditions in terms of, e.g., nutrient contents, thus supporting their utilization and exploitation by deep roots. We aimed to decipher the different phases of soil formation in Dutch drift sands and cover sands. The study site is located at Bedafse Bergen (southeastern Netherlands) in a 200-year-old oak stand. A recent Podzol developed on drift sand covering a Plaggic Anthrosol that was piled up on a relict Podzol on Late Glacial eolian cover sand. Root-free soil and sediment samples, collected in 10–15 cm depth increments, were subjected to a multi-proxy physical and geochemical approach. The Plaggic Anthrosol revealed low bulk density and high phosphorous and organic carbon contents, whereas the relict Podzol was characterized by high iron and aluminum contents. Frequencies of fine (diameter  ≤  2 mm) and medium roots (2–5 mm) were determined on horizontal levels and the profile wall for a detailed pseudo-three-dimensional insight. On horizontal levels, living roots were most abundant in the uppermost part of the relict Podzol with ca. 4450 and 220 m−2, significantly exceeding topsoil root abundances. Roots of oak trees thus benefited from the favorable growth conditions in the nutrient-rich Plaggic Anthrosol, whereas increased compactness and high aluminum contents of the relict Podzol caused a strong decrease of roots. The approach demonstrated the benefit of comprehensive root investigation to support interpretation of soil profiles, as fine roots can be significantly underestimated when quantified at the profile wall. The possible rooting of soil parent material and paleosols long after their burial confirmed recent studies on the potential influence of rooting to overprint sediment–(paleo)soil sequences of various ages, sedimentary and climatic settings. Potential consequences of deep rooting for terrestrial deep carbon stocks, located to a relevant part in paleosols, remain largely unknown and require further investigation.

Abstract

Soil studies commonly comprise the uppermost meter for tracing, e.g., soil development. However, the maximum rooting depth of various plants significantly exceeds this depth. We hypothesized that deeper parts of the soil, soil parent material and especially paleosols provide beneficial conditions in terms of, e.g., nutrient contents, thus supporting their utilization and exploitation by deep roots. We aimed to decipher the different phases of soil formation in Dutch drift sands and cover sands. The study site is located at Bedafse Bergen (southeastern Netherlands) in a 200-year-old oak stand. A recent Podzol developed on drift sand covering a Plaggic Anthrosol that was piled up on a relict Podzol on Late Glacial eolian cover sand. Root-free soil and sediment samples, collected in 10–15 cm depth increments, were subjected to a multi-proxy physical and geochemical approach. The Plaggic Anthrosol revealed low bulk density and high phosphorous and organic carbon contents, whereas the relict Podzol was characterized by high iron and aluminum contents. Frequencies of fine (diameter  ≤  2 mm) and medium roots (2–5 mm) were determined on horizontal levels and the profile wall for a detailed pseudo-three-dimensional insight. On horizontal levels, living roots were most abundant in the uppermost part of the relict Podzol with ca. 4450 and 220 m−2, significantly exceeding topsoil root abundances. Roots of oak trees thus benefited from the favorable growth conditions in the nutrient-rich Plaggic Anthrosol, whereas increased compactness and high aluminum contents of the relict Podzol caused a strong decrease of roots. The approach demonstrated the benefit of comprehensive root investigation to support interpretation of soil profiles, as fine roots can be significantly underestimated when quantified at the profile wall. The possible rooting of soil parent material and paleosols long after their burial confirmed recent studies on the potential influence of rooting to overprint sediment–(paleo)soil sequences of various ages, sedimentary and climatic settings. Potential consequences of deep rooting for terrestrial deep carbon stocks, located to a relevant part in paleosols, remain largely unknown and require further investigation.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Downloads

14 downloads since deposited on 11 Jan 2017
14 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:11 Jan 2017 16:04
Last Modified:03 Jun 2017 10:04
Publisher:Copernicus Publications
ISSN:2199-398X
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2-537-2016

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 5MB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations