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Effect of continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure variability in patients with obstructive sleep apnea


Pengo, Martino F; Ratneswaran, Culadeeban; Berry, Marc; Kent, Brian D; Kohler, Malcolm; Rossi, Gian Paolo; Steier, Joerg (2016). Effect of continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure variability in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Journal of Clinical Hypertension, 18(11):1180-1184.

Abstract

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) improves OSA symptoms and blood pressure (BP) control. The effect of CPAP on BP variability (BPV) in patients with and without hypertension treated with autotitrating CPAP (APAP) for 2 weeks was studied. A total of 78 participants (76.9% men, 49% hypertensive, mean body mass index 36.2 [6.9] kg/m2, age 49.0 [12.9] years) underwent 2 weeks of APAP therapy. Office BP, BPV (standard deviation of three BP measurements), and pulse rate were measured before and after treatment. Systolic BPV (5.3±4.9 vs 4.2±3.4 mm Hg, P=.047) and pulse rate (78.0±14.5 vs 75.5±15.8 beats per minute, P=.032) decreased after treatment, particularly in hypertensive participants. Mask leak was independently associated with reduced changes in systolic BPV (r=−0.237, P=.048). Short-term APAP treatment reduced BPV and pulse rate, particularly in hypertensive patients with OSA.

Abstract

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) improves OSA symptoms and blood pressure (BP) control. The effect of CPAP on BP variability (BPV) in patients with and without hypertension treated with autotitrating CPAP (APAP) for 2 weeks was studied. A total of 78 participants (76.9% men, 49% hypertensive, mean body mass index 36.2 [6.9] kg/m2, age 49.0 [12.9] years) underwent 2 weeks of APAP therapy. Office BP, BPV (standard deviation of three BP measurements), and pulse rate were measured before and after treatment. Systolic BPV (5.3±4.9 vs 4.2±3.4 mm Hg, P=.047) and pulse rate (78.0±14.5 vs 75.5±15.8 beats per minute, P=.032) decreased after treatment, particularly in hypertensive participants. Mask leak was independently associated with reduced changes in systolic BPV (r=−0.237, P=.048). Short-term APAP treatment reduced BPV and pulse rate, particularly in hypertensive patients with OSA.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:November 2016
Deposited On:19 Jan 2017 08:43
Last Modified:19 Jan 2017 08:44
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1524-6175
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/jch.12845
PubMed ID:27251875

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