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Effect of OSA on hypoxic and inflammatory markers during CPAP withdrawal: Further evidence from three randomized control trials


Turnbull, Chris D; Rossi, Valentina A; Santer, Peter; Schwarz, Esther I; Stradling, John R; Petousi, Nayia; Kohler, Malcolm (2017). Effect of OSA on hypoxic and inflammatory markers during CPAP withdrawal: Further evidence from three randomized control trials. Respirology, 22(4):793-799.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is associated with cardiovascular disease. Intermittent hypoxia, endothelial dysfunction and adipose tissue-mediated inflammation have all been linked to cardiovascular disease in OSA. We therefore explored the effect of OSA on relevant associated blood markers: adrenomedullin (ADM), endocan, endothelin-1 (ET-1), resistin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).
METHODS: Patients with OSA, established on and compliant with continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) therapy for >1 year were included from three randomized controlled trials, conducted at two centres. Patients were randomized to either continued therapeutic CPAP or sham CPAP (CPAP withdrawal) for 2 weeks. Blood markers were measured at baseline and at 14 days and the treatment effect between sham CPAP and therapeutic CPAP was analysed.
RESULTS: A total of 109 patients were studied (therapeutic CPAP n = 54, sham CPAP n = 55). Sham CPAP was associated with a return of OSA (between-group difference in oxygen desaturation index (ODI) 36.0/h, 95% CI 29.9-42.2, P < 0.001). Sham CPAP was associated with a reduction in ADM levels at 14 days (-26.0 pg/mL, 95% CI -47.8 to -4.3, P = 0.02), compared to therapeutic CPAP. Return of OSA was not associated with changes in endocan, ET-1, resistin or VEGF.
CONCLUSION: Whilst CPAP withdrawal was associated with return of OSA, it was associated with an unexpected significant reduction in the vasodilator ADM and not with expected increases in hypoxia-induced markers, markers of endothelial function or resistin. We propose that the vascular effects occurring in OSA may be brought about by other mechanisms, perhaps partly through a reduction in ADM.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is associated with cardiovascular disease. Intermittent hypoxia, endothelial dysfunction and adipose tissue-mediated inflammation have all been linked to cardiovascular disease in OSA. We therefore explored the effect of OSA on relevant associated blood markers: adrenomedullin (ADM), endocan, endothelin-1 (ET-1), resistin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).
METHODS: Patients with OSA, established on and compliant with continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) therapy for >1 year were included from three randomized controlled trials, conducted at two centres. Patients were randomized to either continued therapeutic CPAP or sham CPAP (CPAP withdrawal) for 2 weeks. Blood markers were measured at baseline and at 14 days and the treatment effect between sham CPAP and therapeutic CPAP was analysed.
RESULTS: A total of 109 patients were studied (therapeutic CPAP n = 54, sham CPAP n = 55). Sham CPAP was associated with a return of OSA (between-group difference in oxygen desaturation index (ODI) 36.0/h, 95% CI 29.9-42.2, P < 0.001). Sham CPAP was associated with a reduction in ADM levels at 14 days (-26.0 pg/mL, 95% CI -47.8 to -4.3, P = 0.02), compared to therapeutic CPAP. Return of OSA was not associated with changes in endocan, ET-1, resistin or VEGF.
CONCLUSION: Whilst CPAP withdrawal was associated with return of OSA, it was associated with an unexpected significant reduction in the vasodilator ADM and not with expected increases in hypoxia-induced markers, markers of endothelial function or resistin. We propose that the vascular effects occurring in OSA may be brought about by other mechanisms, perhaps partly through a reduction in ADM.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:19 Jan 2017 16:10
Last Modified:12 Apr 2017 01:02
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1323-7799
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/resp.12946
PubMed ID:27860068

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