Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Extracorporeal life support as bridge to lung retransplantation: a multicenter pooled data analysis


Collaud, Stéphane; Benden, Christian; Ganter, Christoph; Hillinger, Sven; Opitz, Isabelle; Schneiter, Didier; Schuepbach, Reto; Inci, Ilhan; Weder, Walter (2016). Extracorporeal life support as bridge to lung retransplantation: a multicenter pooled data analysis. Annals of Thoracic Surgery, 102(5):1680-1686.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) as a bridge to lung retransplantation has been reported only anecdotally. Thus, we analyzed combined data from our center with pooled data from published studies to identify selection criteria for this advanced therapy.
METHODS: Four patients at our center were bridged on ECLS to lung retransplantation. Patient data were retrospectively retrieved from electronic records. The MEDLINE database was searched using the PubMed engine and yielded 13 relevant studies that included a minimum of 3 patients bridged to lung retransplantation, and four studies described detailed data on 17 patients. Patient data from our center (n = 4) were pooled with data from the MEDLINE database (n = 17) and analyzed.
RESULTS: Of 21 patients, 3 (14%) died on ECLS awaiting retransplantation, and 18 (86%) underwent retransplantation after a median of 37 months (range, 0 to 168 months) after primary transplantation. Type of ECLS was extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) in 4, venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in 7, venoarterial ECMO in 5, or was not mentioned in 2. The 90-day postoperative mortality was 28%. Overall 1-year survival was 48%. Patients bridged to retransplantation with ECCO2R/venovenous ECMO (p = 0.05) or on awake ECMO (p = 0.06) showed strong trends toward better survival in univariate analysis. Univariate and multivariate analysis identified a longer intertransplant interval as a statistically significant favorable prognostic factor. In a selected subgroup of patients (awake ECCO2R/venovenous ECMO support and intertransplant interval >2 years), 1-year survival reached 67%.
CONCLUSIONS: Despite limited overall 1-year survival for patients bridged with ECLS to lung retransplantation, careful patient selection may yield an acceptable 1-year survival of 67%.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) as a bridge to lung retransplantation has been reported only anecdotally. Thus, we analyzed combined data from our center with pooled data from published studies to identify selection criteria for this advanced therapy.
METHODS: Four patients at our center were bridged on ECLS to lung retransplantation. Patient data were retrospectively retrieved from electronic records. The MEDLINE database was searched using the PubMed engine and yielded 13 relevant studies that included a minimum of 3 patients bridged to lung retransplantation, and four studies described detailed data on 17 patients. Patient data from our center (n = 4) were pooled with data from the MEDLINE database (n = 17) and analyzed.
RESULTS: Of 21 patients, 3 (14%) died on ECLS awaiting retransplantation, and 18 (86%) underwent retransplantation after a median of 37 months (range, 0 to 168 months) after primary transplantation. Type of ECLS was extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) in 4, venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in 7, venoarterial ECMO in 5, or was not mentioned in 2. The 90-day postoperative mortality was 28%. Overall 1-year survival was 48%. Patients bridged to retransplantation with ECCO2R/venovenous ECMO (p = 0.05) or on awake ECMO (p = 0.06) showed strong trends toward better survival in univariate analysis. Univariate and multivariate analysis identified a longer intertransplant interval as a statistically significant favorable prognostic factor. In a selected subgroup of patients (awake ECCO2R/venovenous ECMO support and intertransplant interval >2 years), 1-year survival reached 67%.
CONCLUSIONS: Despite limited overall 1-year survival for patients bridged with ECLS to lung retransplantation, careful patient selection may yield an acceptable 1-year survival of 67%.

Statistics

Citations

4 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Thoracic Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:November 2016
Deposited On:19 Jan 2017 15:16
Last Modified:10 Feb 2017 07:12
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0003-4975
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2016.05.014
PubMed ID:27424471

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher