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Synthetic meshes in the treatment of postoperative fascial dehiscence of the spine


Jentzsch, Thorsten; Geiger, James; Werner, Clément M L (2017). Synthetic meshes in the treatment of postoperative fascial dehiscence of the spine. Journal of back and musculoskeletal rehabilitation, 30(1):153-162.

Abstract

BACKGROUND A fascial dehiscence after spinal instrumentation is usually located at the mechanically stressed interscapular thoracic spine and often causes cosmetic impairment and pain. However, therapy options remain barely discussed. Synthetic meshes have been successfully used in the treatment of abdominal hernias.
OBJECTIVE It was hypothesized that synthetic meshes are a successful treatment option for spinal fascial dehiscence.
METHODS This retrospective study of a prospective database investigated all consecutive patients who received a synthetic mesh for a fascial dehiscence of the spine between 2010 and 2014 after prior spinal instrumentation. Primary outcomes were healing of the fascial dehiscence, recurrence, infection, revision, subjective satisfaction on a visual analog scale (VAS), and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Among others, secondary outcomes consisted of seroma formation and return to work. The evaluated risk factors consisted of the body mass index (BMI), outer abdominal fat (OAF), back tissue, smoking, immunomodulatory therapy, preoperative radiation dose, and instrumented levels.
RESULTS Sixteen patients with a mean follow up of 24 months were included. Every fascial dehiscence successfully healed with the synthetic mesh and there were no recurrences, infections or revisions. The mean subjective satisfaction level was VAS 7.3 and the mean ODI was 26%. Five (31%) patients had a seroma postoperatively, but did not show any differences in the outcome (e.g. ODI of 28%). In the patient group < 65 years (n = 12), all but two patients, who had work restrictions due to other diseases, regained at least some capacity to work. Worse ODI scores were found for patients with increased BMI, OAF, back tissue, cortisone therapy, instrumented levels, preoperative radiation dose, and for smokers.
CONCLUSION Synthetic meshes are a successful treatment option for spinal fascial dehiscence, even seemingly in patients with a higher risk profile such as obese and immunocompromised patients as well as in revision procedures. They are associated with respectable cosmetic results, pain relief and clinical outcome. Postoperatively, it is recommended to leave drains for more than five to seven days in order to avoid seroma formation and to avoid weight training for six weeks. Further prospective, comparative studies are recommended.

Abstract

BACKGROUND A fascial dehiscence after spinal instrumentation is usually located at the mechanically stressed interscapular thoracic spine and often causes cosmetic impairment and pain. However, therapy options remain barely discussed. Synthetic meshes have been successfully used in the treatment of abdominal hernias.
OBJECTIVE It was hypothesized that synthetic meshes are a successful treatment option for spinal fascial dehiscence.
METHODS This retrospective study of a prospective database investigated all consecutive patients who received a synthetic mesh for a fascial dehiscence of the spine between 2010 and 2014 after prior spinal instrumentation. Primary outcomes were healing of the fascial dehiscence, recurrence, infection, revision, subjective satisfaction on a visual analog scale (VAS), and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Among others, secondary outcomes consisted of seroma formation and return to work. The evaluated risk factors consisted of the body mass index (BMI), outer abdominal fat (OAF), back tissue, smoking, immunomodulatory therapy, preoperative radiation dose, and instrumented levels.
RESULTS Sixteen patients with a mean follow up of 24 months were included. Every fascial dehiscence successfully healed with the synthetic mesh and there were no recurrences, infections or revisions. The mean subjective satisfaction level was VAS 7.3 and the mean ODI was 26%. Five (31%) patients had a seroma postoperatively, but did not show any differences in the outcome (e.g. ODI of 28%). In the patient group < 65 years (n = 12), all but two patients, who had work restrictions due to other diseases, regained at least some capacity to work. Worse ODI scores were found for patients with increased BMI, OAF, back tissue, cortisone therapy, instrumented levels, preoperative radiation dose, and for smokers.
CONCLUSION Synthetic meshes are a successful treatment option for spinal fascial dehiscence, even seemingly in patients with a higher risk profile such as obese and immunocompromised patients as well as in revision procedures. They are associated with respectable cosmetic results, pain relief and clinical outcome. Postoperatively, it is recommended to leave drains for more than five to seven days in order to avoid seroma formation and to avoid weight training for six weeks. Further prospective, comparative studies are recommended.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Trauma Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:30 June 2017
Deposited On:16 Jan 2017 08:09
Last Modified:17 Jan 2017 08:44
Publisher:I O S Press
ISSN:1053-8127
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3233/BMR-160728
PubMed ID:27392842

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