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In-screw cement augmentation for iliosacral screw fixation in posterior ring pathologies with insufficient bone stock


König, M A; Hediger, S; Schmitt, J W; Jentzsch, T; Sprengel, K; Werner, C M L (2016). In-screw cement augmentation for iliosacral screw fixation in posterior ring pathologies with insufficient bone stock. European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Minimal invasive screw fixation is common for treating posterior pelvic ring pathologies, but lack of bone quality may cause anchorage problems. The aim of this study was to report in detail a new technique combining iliosacral screw fixation with in-screw cement augmentation (ISFICA).
DESCRIPTION OF TECHNIQUE The patient was put under general anesthesia and placed in the supine position. A K-wire was inserted under inlet-outlet view to guide the fully threaded screw. The screw placement followed in adequate position. Cement was applied through a bone filler device, inserted at the screwdriver. The immediate control of cement distribution, accurate screw placement and potential leakage were obtained via intraoperative CT scan.
PATIENTS AND METHODS Twenty consecutive patients treated with ISFICA were included in this study. The mean age was 74.4 years (range 48-98). Screw placement, possible cement leakage and screw positioning were evaluated via intraoperative CT scan. Postoperative neurologic deficits, pain reduction and immediate postoperative mobilization were clinically evaluated.
RESULTS Twenty-six screws were implanted. All patients were postoperatively, instantly mobilized with reduced pain. No neurologic deficits were apparent postoperatively. No cement leakage occurred. One breach of the iliac cortical bone was noted due to severe osteoporosis. One screw migration was seen after 1 year and two patients showed iliosacral joint arthropathy, which led to screw removal.
CONCLUSION ISFICA is a very promising technique in terms of safety, precision and initial postoperative outcome. Long-term outcomes such as lasting mechanical stability or pain reduction and screw loosening despite cement augmentation should be investigated in further studies with larger patient numbers.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Minimal invasive screw fixation is common for treating posterior pelvic ring pathologies, but lack of bone quality may cause anchorage problems. The aim of this study was to report in detail a new technique combining iliosacral screw fixation with in-screw cement augmentation (ISFICA).
DESCRIPTION OF TECHNIQUE The patient was put under general anesthesia and placed in the supine position. A K-wire was inserted under inlet-outlet view to guide the fully threaded screw. The screw placement followed in adequate position. Cement was applied through a bone filler device, inserted at the screwdriver. The immediate control of cement distribution, accurate screw placement and potential leakage were obtained via intraoperative CT scan.
PATIENTS AND METHODS Twenty consecutive patients treated with ISFICA were included in this study. The mean age was 74.4 years (range 48-98). Screw placement, possible cement leakage and screw positioning were evaluated via intraoperative CT scan. Postoperative neurologic deficits, pain reduction and immediate postoperative mobilization were clinically evaluated.
RESULTS Twenty-six screws were implanted. All patients were postoperatively, instantly mobilized with reduced pain. No neurologic deficits were apparent postoperatively. No cement leakage occurred. One breach of the iliac cortical bone was noted due to severe osteoporosis. One screw migration was seen after 1 year and two patients showed iliosacral joint arthropathy, which led to screw removal.
CONCLUSION ISFICA is a very promising technique in terms of safety, precision and initial postoperative outcome. Long-term outcomes such as lasting mechanical stability or pain reduction and screw loosening despite cement augmentation should be investigated in further studies with larger patient numbers.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Department of Trauma Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:11 May 2016
Deposited On:16 Jan 2017 09:12
Last Modified:23 Nov 2017 03:29
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1863-9933
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00068-016-0681-6
PubMed ID:27167237

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