Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Testing the importance of a common ectomycorrhizal network for dipterocarp seedling growth and survival in tropical forests of Borneo


Brearley, Francis Q; Saner, Philippe; Uchida, Ayuho; Burslem, David F R P; Hector, Andy; Nilus, Reuben; Scholes, Julie D; Egli, Simon (2017). Testing the importance of a common ectomycorrhizal network for dipterocarp seedling growth and survival in tropical forests of Borneo. Plant Ecology and Diversity, 9(5-6):563-576.

Abstract

Background: Connections between mature trees and seedlings via ectomycorrhizal (EcM) hyphal networks existing in dipterocarp-dominated tropical rain forests of South-east Asia could have strong implications for seedling growth and survival and the maintenance of high diversity in such forests.
Aim: To test whether EcM hyphal network connections are important for the growth and survival of dipterocarp seedlings.
Methods: We conducted four independent experiments that prevented contact of experimental seedlings with an EcM network by using a series of fine meshes and/or plastic barriers. We measured the growth and survival (and foliar δ13C in one experiment) of seedlings of six dipterocarp species over intervals ranging from 11 to 29 months.
Results: Seedling growth (diameter, height or leaf number) was unaffected by exclusion from the EcM network in three experiments and there were no differences in foliar δ13C values in the fourth. Seedling survival was reduced following exclusion from the EcM network in one experiment. Our results give little support to the hypothesis that dipterocarp seedlings growing in the shaded forest understorey benefit from being connected, through a common EcM network, to surrounding trees.
Conclusions: We suggest that our negative results, in contrast to studies conducted in low diversity boreo-temperate or tropical forests, are due to these high diversity forests lacking host species-specific EcM fungi, and therefore providing little opportunity for adaptive support of seedlings via hyphal networks

Abstract

Background: Connections between mature trees and seedlings via ectomycorrhizal (EcM) hyphal networks existing in dipterocarp-dominated tropical rain forests of South-east Asia could have strong implications for seedling growth and survival and the maintenance of high diversity in such forests.
Aim: To test whether EcM hyphal network connections are important for the growth and survival of dipterocarp seedlings.
Methods: We conducted four independent experiments that prevented contact of experimental seedlings with an EcM network by using a series of fine meshes and/or plastic barriers. We measured the growth and survival (and foliar δ13C in one experiment) of seedlings of six dipterocarp species over intervals ranging from 11 to 29 months.
Results: Seedling growth (diameter, height or leaf number) was unaffected by exclusion from the EcM network in three experiments and there were no differences in foliar δ13C values in the fourth. Seedling survival was reduced following exclusion from the EcM network in one experiment. Our results give little support to the hypothesis that dipterocarp seedlings growing in the shaded forest understorey benefit from being connected, through a common EcM network, to surrounding trees.
Conclusions: We suggest that our negative results, in contrast to studies conducted in low diversity boreo-temperate or tropical forests, are due to these high diversity forests lacking host species-specific EcM fungi, and therefore providing little opportunity for adaptive support of seedlings via hyphal networks

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 19 Jan 2017
2 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:19 Jan 2017 08:21
Last Modified:14 Jun 2017 01:01
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1755-0874
Additional Information:This is an Author's Accepted Manuscript of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the article as published in the Plant Ecology and Diversity 2017 copyright Taylor & Francis, available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/17550874.2017.1283649

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only until 1 January 2018
Size: 883kB
View at publisher
Embargo till: 2018-01-01

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations