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On correlated change in personality


Allemand, Mathias; Martin, Mike (2016). On correlated change in personality. European Psychologist, 21(4):237-253.

Abstract

Correlated change in personality is essential to understanding change and development. It refers to the question of whether and to what degree changes in personality are interrelated over time within and between individuals. Compared to the longstanding literature on personality development, relatively less research has focused on correlated change in personality. The main goal of this paper is thus to discuss the potential of this concept for the field of personality development. First, we define correlated change and propose a categorization framework with multiple dimensions. Second, we discuss several theoretical concepts of correlated change that help understand the patterns, causes, and mechanisms underlying correlated change in personality. Third, we briefly describe several statistical approaches to modeling correlated change. Fourth, we summarize previous research on correlated change in personality. We focus our research on (a) correlated change within the Big Five personality traits, and (b) between the Big Five personality traits and three domains of life. Finally, we conclude by discussing challenges and future directions of the concept for the field of personality development.

Abstract

Correlated change in personality is essential to understanding change and development. It refers to the question of whether and to what degree changes in personality are interrelated over time within and between individuals. Compared to the longstanding literature on personality development, relatively less research has focused on correlated change in personality. The main goal of this paper is thus to discuss the potential of this concept for the field of personality development. First, we define correlated change and propose a categorization framework with multiple dimensions. Second, we discuss several theoretical concepts of correlated change that help understand the patterns, causes, and mechanisms underlying correlated change in personality. Third, we briefly describe several statistical approaches to modeling correlated change. Fourth, we summarize previous research on correlated change in personality. We focus our research on (a) correlated change within the Big Five personality traits, and (b) between the Big Five personality traits and three domains of life. Finally, we conclude by discussing challenges and future directions of the concept for the field of personality development.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:23 Jan 2017 14:36
Last Modified:26 Feb 2017 08:33
Publisher:Hogrefe & Huber
ISSN:1016-9040
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1027/1016-9040/a000256

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Language: English
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Embargo till: 2017-12-07

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