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Directed in situ shaping of complex nano- and microstructures during chemical synthesis


Artus, Georg; Olveira, Sandro; Patra, Debabrata; Seeger, Stefan (2017). Directed in situ shaping of complex nano- and microstructures during chemical synthesis. Macromolecular Rapid Communications, 38(4):Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

Chemical composition and shape determine the basic properties of any object. Commonly, chemical synthesis and shaping follow each other in a sequence, although their combination into a single process would be an elegant simplification. Here, a pathway of simultaneous synthesis and shaping as applied to polysiloxanes on the micro- and nanoscale is presented. Complex structures such as stars, chalices, helices, volcanoes, rods, or combinations thereof are obtained. Varying the shape-controlling reaction parameters including temperature, water saturation, and the type of substrate allows to direct the reaction toward specific structures. A general mechanism of growth is suggested and analytical evidence and thermodynamic calculations to support it are provided. An aqueous droplet in either gaseous atmosphere or in a liquid organic solvent serves as a spatially confined polymerization volume. By substituting the starting materials, germanium-based nanostructures are also obtained. This transferability marks this approach as a major step toward a generally applicable method of chemical synthesis including in situ shaping.

Abstract

Chemical composition and shape determine the basic properties of any object. Commonly, chemical synthesis and shaping follow each other in a sequence, although their combination into a single process would be an elegant simplification. Here, a pathway of simultaneous synthesis and shaping as applied to polysiloxanes on the micro- and nanoscale is presented. Complex structures such as stars, chalices, helices, volcanoes, rods, or combinations thereof are obtained. Varying the shape-controlling reaction parameters including temperature, water saturation, and the type of substrate allows to direct the reaction toward specific structures. A general mechanism of growth is suggested and analytical evidence and thermodynamic calculations to support it are provided. An aqueous droplet in either gaseous atmosphere or in a liquid organic solvent serves as a spatially confined polymerization volume. By substituting the starting materials, germanium-based nanostructures are also obtained. This transferability marks this approach as a major step toward a generally applicable method of chemical synthesis including in situ shaping.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:3 January 2017
Deposited On:25 Jan 2017 09:22
Last Modified:22 Feb 2017 02:03
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1022-1336
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/marc.201600558
PubMed ID:28052443

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