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Science in the context of climate change adaptation: Case studies from the Peruvian Andes


Orlowsky, Boris; Andres, Norina; Salzmann, Nadine; Huggel, Christian; Jurt, Christine; Vicuña, Luis; Rohrer, Mario; Calanca, Pierluigi; Neukom, Raphael; Drenkhan, Fabian (2016). Science in the context of climate change adaptation: Case studies from the Peruvian Andes. In: Salzmann, Nadine; Huggel, Christian; Nussbaumer, Samuel U; Ziervogel, Gina. Climate change adaptation strategies – an upstream-downstream perspective. Cham: Springer, 41-58.

Abstract

Within the context of the Climate Change Adaptation Program (PACC), a number of scientifi c investigations on water resources, natural disasters and perceptions by local people highlight adaptation needs in the regions of Cusco and Apurímac in Peru, considering past, present-day and future climate conditions. This chapter compiles their findings and attempts a systematic evaluation with respect to their contributions to climate change adaptation. The studies consistently find aggravating water scarcity during the dry season (April to September) due to projected precipitation decreases and reduced storage capacity of shrinking glaciers. Impacts include below-capacity hydropower generation and increased crop failure risks. For natural disasters, database inconsistencies prevent a detection of trends. While the natural science studies have produced a new and more comprehensive understanding of the target regions, their implications for society have hardly been investigated anthropologically. One of the few social science studies emphasizes that climate change is only one out of many determinants of rural livelihoods in the target regions, which have not been addressed scientifi cally yet. We thereby find an imbalance of available scientific knowledge regarding natural vs. social sciences. Overcoming such imbalance would allow for a more comprehensive integration of scientific findings into design and implementation of adaptation measures within
the local context.

Abstract

Within the context of the Climate Change Adaptation Program (PACC), a number of scientifi c investigations on water resources, natural disasters and perceptions by local people highlight adaptation needs in the regions of Cusco and Apurímac in Peru, considering past, present-day and future climate conditions. This chapter compiles their findings and attempts a systematic evaluation with respect to their contributions to climate change adaptation. The studies consistently find aggravating water scarcity during the dry season (April to September) due to projected precipitation decreases and reduced storage capacity of shrinking glaciers. Impacts include below-capacity hydropower generation and increased crop failure risks. For natural disasters, database inconsistencies prevent a detection of trends. While the natural science studies have produced a new and more comprehensive understanding of the target regions, their implications for society have hardly been investigated anthropologically. One of the few social science studies emphasizes that climate change is only one out of many determinants of rural livelihoods in the target regions, which have not been addressed scientifi cally yet. We thereby find an imbalance of available scientific knowledge regarding natural vs. social sciences. Overcoming such imbalance would allow for a more comprehensive integration of scientific findings into design and implementation of adaptation measures within
the local context.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:25 Jan 2017 09:39
Last Modified:25 Jan 2017 10:24
Publisher:Springer
ISBN:978-3-319-40771-5
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-40773-9_3

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