Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Closed reduction and fluoroscopic assisted percutaneous pinning of 42 physeal fractures in 37 dogs and 4 cats


Boekhout-Ta, Christina L; Kim, Stanley E; Corss, Alan R; Pozzi, Antonio; Evans, Richard (2017). Closed reduction and fluoroscopic assisted percutaneous pinning of 42 physeal fractures in 37 dogs and 4 cats. Veterinary Surgery, 46(1):103-110.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To report complications and clinical outcome of dogs and cats that underwent fluoroscopic-assisted percutaneous pinning (FAPP) of physeal fractures.
STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective study.
ANIMALS: Client-owned dogs (n = 37) and cats (n = 4).
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Records (August 2007-August 2014) of physeal fractures treated with FAPP in 3 hospitals were evaluated. Data collected included signalment, fracture characteristics (etiology, location, duration, Salter-Harris classification, preoperative and postoperative displacement), surgical information (implant size, surgical duration), and outcome assessment information (functional outcome, radiographic outcome, and complications).
RESULTS: The majority of animals (92%) were classified as full functional outcome. No significant predictors of functional outcome were identified. The overall complication rate was 15% (n = 6). Elective pin removal rate was 41% (n = 17). Goniometry and limb circumference measurements of the affected and contralateral limbs were not significantly different in dogs for which measurements were obtained. Seventeen of 18 animals (16 dogs, 2 cats) measured had bone length changes on follow-up radiographs.
CONCLUSION: FAPP is associated with an excellent functional outcome in a narrow selection of fracture configurations, specifically those with minimal displacement and for which anatomical alignment can be achieved with closed reduction.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To report complications and clinical outcome of dogs and cats that underwent fluoroscopic-assisted percutaneous pinning (FAPP) of physeal fractures.
STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective study.
ANIMALS: Client-owned dogs (n = 37) and cats (n = 4).
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Records (August 2007-August 2014) of physeal fractures treated with FAPP in 3 hospitals were evaluated. Data collected included signalment, fracture characteristics (etiology, location, duration, Salter-Harris classification, preoperative and postoperative displacement), surgical information (implant size, surgical duration), and outcome assessment information (functional outcome, radiographic outcome, and complications).
RESULTS: The majority of animals (92%) were classified as full functional outcome. No significant predictors of functional outcome were identified. The overall complication rate was 15% (n = 6). Elective pin removal rate was 41% (n = 17). Goniometry and limb circumference measurements of the affected and contralateral limbs were not significantly different in dogs for which measurements were obtained. Seventeen of 18 animals (16 dogs, 2 cats) measured had bone length changes on follow-up radiographs.
CONCLUSION: FAPP is associated with an excellent functional outcome in a narrow selection of fracture configurations, specifically those with minimal displacement and for which anatomical alignment can be achieved with closed reduction.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 24 Jan 2017
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:24 Jan 2017 10:25
Last Modified:25 Jan 2017 02:04
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0161-3499
Additional Information:This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Boekhout-Ta, C. L., Kim, S. E., Cross, A. R., Evans, R. and Pozzi, A. (2017), Closed reduction and fluoroscopic-assisted percutaneous pinning of 42 physeal fractures in 37 dogs and 4 cats*. Veterinary Surgery, 46: 103–110. doi:10.1111/vsu.12582, which has been published in final form at DOI: 10.1111/vsu.12582. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-820227.html#terms).
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/vsu.12582
PubMed ID:27925240

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Accepted Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only until 7 December 2017
Size: 179kB
View at publisher
Embargo till: 2017-12-07