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Microclimate determines community composition but not richness of epiphytic understory bryophytes of rainforest and cacao agroforests in Indonesia


Goda Sporn, S; Bos, M M; Hoffstätter-Müncheberg, M; Kessler, M; Gradstein, S R (2009). Microclimate determines community composition but not richness of epiphytic understory bryophytes of rainforest and cacao agroforests in Indonesia. Functional Plant Biology, 36(2):171-179.

Abstract

Management intensification in cultivated, tropical forests drives changes in the microclimate that can threaten native forest flora and fauna. In this study, we use epiphytic bryophytes, known to be sensitive to microclimatic changes due to their lack of a protective cuticle and the exposed habitat, to investigate the predictive power of microclimate for changes in species richness and composition. Bryophytes were sampled from understory trees in natural forest and cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) trees in two types of cacao agroforests (natural shade trees and planted shade trees) in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia. The microclimate in the agroforests was characterised by low air humidity and high air temperature during the afternoon. Bryophyte species richness did not differ between habitat types but species composition changed markedly from the natural forest to the cacao agroforests. Although no correlation between species richness and microclimate values could be found, a series of matrix-based analyses revealed a significantly positive relationship between similarities in species composition and in maximum values for temperature and minimum values for humidity, which suggests that microclimatic changes are a good predictor for high turnover of bryophyte community composition from natural forests to cacao agroforests.

Abstract

Management intensification in cultivated, tropical forests drives changes in the microclimate that can threaten native forest flora and fauna. In this study, we use epiphytic bryophytes, known to be sensitive to microclimatic changes due to their lack of a protective cuticle and the exposed habitat, to investigate the predictive power of microclimate for changes in species richness and composition. Bryophytes were sampled from understory trees in natural forest and cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) trees in two types of cacao agroforests (natural shade trees and planted shade trees) in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia. The microclimate in the agroforests was characterised by low air humidity and high air temperature during the afternoon. Bryophyte species richness did not differ between habitat types but species composition changed markedly from the natural forest to the cacao agroforests. Although no correlation between species richness and microclimate values could be found, a series of matrix-based analyses revealed a significantly positive relationship between similarities in species composition and in maximum values for temperature and minimum values for humidity, which suggests that microclimatic changes are a good predictor for high turnover of bryophyte community composition from natural forests to cacao agroforests.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Language:English
Date:February 2009
Deposited On:13 Mar 2009 15:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:59
Publisher:CSIRO
ISSN:1445-4416
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1071/FP08197

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