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The Bohr Effect is not a likely promoter of renal preglomerular oxygen shunting


Olgac, Ufuk; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan (2016). The Bohr Effect is not a likely promoter of renal preglomerular oxygen shunting. Frontiers in Physiology, 7:482.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate whether possible preglomerular arterial-to-venous oxygen shunting is affected by the interaction between renal preglomerular carbon dioxide and oxygen transport. We hypothesized that a reverse (venous-to-arterial) shunting of carbon dioxide will increase partial pressure of carbon dioxide and decrease pH in the arteries and thereby lead to increased oxygen offloading and consequent oxygen shunting. To test this hypothesis, we employed a segment-wise three-dimensional computational model of coupled renal oxygen and carbon dioxide transport, wherein coupling is achieved by shifting the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve in dependence of local changes in partial pressure of carbon dioxide and pH. The model suggests that primarily due to the high buffering capacity of blood, there is only marginally increased acidity in the preglomerular vasculature compared to systemic arterial blood caused by carbon dioxide shunting. Furthermore, effects of carbon dioxide transport do not promote but rather impair preglomerular oxygen shunting, as the increase in acidity is higher in the veins compared to that in the arteries. We conclude that while substantial arterial-to-venous oxygen shunting might take place in the postglomerular vasculature, the net amount of oxygen shunted at the preglomerular vasculature appears to be marginal.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate whether possible preglomerular arterial-to-venous oxygen shunting is affected by the interaction between renal preglomerular carbon dioxide and oxygen transport. We hypothesized that a reverse (venous-to-arterial) shunting of carbon dioxide will increase partial pressure of carbon dioxide and decrease pH in the arteries and thereby lead to increased oxygen offloading and consequent oxygen shunting. To test this hypothesis, we employed a segment-wise three-dimensional computational model of coupled renal oxygen and carbon dioxide transport, wherein coupling is achieved by shifting the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve in dependence of local changes in partial pressure of carbon dioxide and pH. The model suggests that primarily due to the high buffering capacity of blood, there is only marginally increased acidity in the preglomerular vasculature compared to systemic arterial blood caused by carbon dioxide shunting. Furthermore, effects of carbon dioxide transport do not promote but rather impair preglomerular oxygen shunting, as the increase in acidity is higher in the veins compared to that in the arteries. We conclude that while substantial arterial-to-venous oxygen shunting might take place in the postglomerular vasculature, the net amount of oxygen shunted at the preglomerular vasculature appears to be marginal.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:26 Jan 2017 11:45
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 22:39
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:1664-042X
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2016.00482
PubMed ID:27833564

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