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Avoiding methodological biases in meta-analysis: Use of online versus offline individual participant data (IPD) in educational psychology


Kaufmann, Esther; Reips, Ulf-Dietrich; Maag Merki, Katharina (2016). Avoiding methodological biases in meta-analysis: Use of online versus offline individual participant data (IPD) in educational psychology. Zeitschrift für Psychologie - Journal of Psychology, 224(3):157-167.

Abstract

Individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis is the gold standard of meta-analyses. This paper points out several advantages of IPD meta-analysis over classical meta-analysis, such as avoiding aggregation bias (e.g., ecological fallacy or Simpson’s paradox) and shows how its two main disadvantages (time and cost) can be overcome through Internet-based research. Ideally, we recommend carrying out IPD meta-analyses that consider online versus offline data gathering processes and examine data quality. Through a comprehensive literature search, we investigated whether IPD meta-analyses published in the field of educational psychology already follow these recommendations; this was not the case. For this reason, the paper demonstrates characteristics of ideal meta-analysis on teachers’ judgment accuracy and links it to recent meta-analyses on that topic. The recommendations are important for meta-analysis researchers and for readers and reviewers of meta-analyses. Our paper is also relevant to current discussions within the psychological community on study replication.

Abstract

Individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis is the gold standard of meta-analyses. This paper points out several advantages of IPD meta-analysis over classical meta-analysis, such as avoiding aggregation bias (e.g., ecological fallacy or Simpson’s paradox) and shows how its two main disadvantages (time and cost) can be overcome through Internet-based research. Ideally, we recommend carrying out IPD meta-analyses that consider online versus offline data gathering processes and examine data quality. Through a comprehensive literature search, we investigated whether IPD meta-analyses published in the field of educational psychology already follow these recommendations; this was not the case. For this reason, the paper demonstrates characteristics of ideal meta-analysis on teachers’ judgment accuracy and links it to recent meta-analyses on that topic. The recommendations are important for meta-analysis researchers and for readers and reviewers of meta-analyses. Our paper is also relevant to current discussions within the psychological community on study replication.

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1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Education
Dewey Decimal Classification:370 Education
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:26 Jan 2017 15:43
Last Modified:26 Jan 2017 15:43
Publisher:Hogrefe Verlag
ISSN:2190-8370
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1027/2151-2604/a000251
Related URLs:http://econtent.hogrefe.com/ (Publisher)

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