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Rapid Drink Challenge in high-resolution manometry: an adjunctive test for detection of esophageal motility disorders


Ang, D; Hollenstein, M; Misselwitz, B; Knowles, K; Wright, J; Tucker, E; Sweis, R; Fox, M (2017). Rapid Drink Challenge in high-resolution manometry: an adjunctive test for detection of esophageal motility disorders. Neurogastroenterology and Motility, 29(1):e12902.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS The Chicago Classification for diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders by high-resolution manometry (HRM) is based on single water swallows (SWS). Emerging data suggest that a "Rapid Drink Challenge" (RDC) increases sensitivity for motility disorders. This study establishes normal values and diagnostic thresholds for RDC in clinical practice.
METHODS Two cohort studies were performed in patients with dysphagia or reflux symptoms (development and validation sets). Healthy subjects and patient controls provided reference values. Ten SWS and two 200-mL RDC were performed. Primary diagnosis for SWS was established by the Chicago Classification. Abnormal RDC was defined by impaired esophagogastric junction (EGJ) function (elevated integrated relaxation pressure during RDC [IRP-RDC]); incomplete inhibition of contractility during and ineffective contraction after RDC. Diagnostic thresholds identified in the development set were prospectively tested in the validation set.
RESULTS Normal values were determined in healthy (n=95; age 37.8 ± 12) and patient controls (n=44; age 46.4 ± 15). Development and validation sets included 178 (54 ± 17 years) and 226 (53 ± 16 years) patients, respectively. Integrated relaxation pressure during RDC was higher for SWS than RDC in all groups (overall P<.001), except achalasia. Rapid Drink Challenge suppressed contractility, except in achalasia type III, spasm, and hypercontractile motility disorders (P<.001). An effective after-contraction was present more often in health than disease (P<.001). Optimal diagnostic thresholds identified in the development set (IRP-RDC ≥12 mmHg achalasia, IRP-RDC ≥ 8mmHg "all cause" EGJ dysfunction), were confirmed in the validation set (both, sensitivity ~85%, specificity >95%).
CONCLUSIONS Rapid Drink Challenge contributes clinically relevant information to routine HRM studies, especially in patients with EGJ dysfunction.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS The Chicago Classification for diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders by high-resolution manometry (HRM) is based on single water swallows (SWS). Emerging data suggest that a "Rapid Drink Challenge" (RDC) increases sensitivity for motility disorders. This study establishes normal values and diagnostic thresholds for RDC in clinical practice.
METHODS Two cohort studies were performed in patients with dysphagia or reflux symptoms (development and validation sets). Healthy subjects and patient controls provided reference values. Ten SWS and two 200-mL RDC were performed. Primary diagnosis for SWS was established by the Chicago Classification. Abnormal RDC was defined by impaired esophagogastric junction (EGJ) function (elevated integrated relaxation pressure during RDC [IRP-RDC]); incomplete inhibition of contractility during and ineffective contraction after RDC. Diagnostic thresholds identified in the development set were prospectively tested in the validation set.
RESULTS Normal values were determined in healthy (n=95; age 37.8 ± 12) and patient controls (n=44; age 46.4 ± 15). Development and validation sets included 178 (54 ± 17 years) and 226 (53 ± 16 years) patients, respectively. Integrated relaxation pressure during RDC was higher for SWS than RDC in all groups (overall P<.001), except achalasia. Rapid Drink Challenge suppressed contractility, except in achalasia type III, spasm, and hypercontractile motility disorders (P<.001). An effective after-contraction was present more often in health than disease (P<.001). Optimal diagnostic thresholds identified in the development set (IRP-RDC ≥12 mmHg achalasia, IRP-RDC ≥ 8mmHg "all cause" EGJ dysfunction), were confirmed in the validation set (both, sensitivity ~85%, specificity >95%).
CONCLUSIONS Rapid Drink Challenge contributes clinically relevant information to routine HRM studies, especially in patients with EGJ dysfunction.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:January 2017
Deposited On:30 Jan 2017 15:21
Last Modified:30 Jan 2017 15:30
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1350-1925
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/nmo.12902
PubMed ID:27420913

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