Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Breastfeeding in women having experienced childhood sexual abuse


Elfgen, Constanze; Hagenbuch, Niels; Görres, Gisela; Block, Emina; Leeners, Brigitte (2017). Breastfeeding in women having experienced childhood sexual abuse. Journal of Human Lactation, 33(1):119-127.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) can have a serious effect on general and obstetric health. Breastfeeding includes several triggers for memories of abuse experiences, which will likely influence decisions about breastfeeding and its implementation in daily life. This is important since breastfeeding improves maternal well-being and bonding with the child. Research aim: As breastfeeding strongly influences the long-term health of children, we investigated experiences with breastfeeding in women with a history of CSA.
METHODS Data on breastfeeding were collected within a research project designed to compare labor and delivery experiences in women with a history of CSA to women without such antecedents. Data from 85 women having experienced CSA and 170 controls pair-matched for maternal age, children's age, and nationality were evaluated. The clinical record of pregnancy and a self-administered questionnaire were used to collect data.
RESULTS Although the prevalence of breastfeeding was similar in women with and without CSA experiences (96.5% vs. 90.6%), women exposed to CSA more often described complications associated with breastfeeding (77.7% vs. 67.1%, p = .08). Mastitis (49.4% vs. 27.6%, p < .01) and pain (29.4% vs. 18.8%, p = .15) were reported significantly more often by women after CSA. For 20% of women after CSA, breastfeeding was a trigger for memories of CSA. Furthermore, 58% of women with CSA reported dissociation when breastfeeding.
CONCLUSION In addition to the growing list of potential health consequences of CSA experience, this experience seems to be associated with an increased number of problems when breastfeeding. However, most women with a history of CSA intend to breastfeed despite particular challenges related to CSA. A support protocol tailored to the specific needs of these women during pregnancy and the lactation period may help to improve breastfeeding and the early mother-child relationship.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) can have a serious effect on general and obstetric health. Breastfeeding includes several triggers for memories of abuse experiences, which will likely influence decisions about breastfeeding and its implementation in daily life. This is important since breastfeeding improves maternal well-being and bonding with the child. Research aim: As breastfeeding strongly influences the long-term health of children, we investigated experiences with breastfeeding in women with a history of CSA.
METHODS Data on breastfeeding were collected within a research project designed to compare labor and delivery experiences in women with a history of CSA to women without such antecedents. Data from 85 women having experienced CSA and 170 controls pair-matched for maternal age, children's age, and nationality were evaluated. The clinical record of pregnancy and a self-administered questionnaire were used to collect data.
RESULTS Although the prevalence of breastfeeding was similar in women with and without CSA experiences (96.5% vs. 90.6%), women exposed to CSA more often described complications associated with breastfeeding (77.7% vs. 67.1%, p = .08). Mastitis (49.4% vs. 27.6%, p < .01) and pain (29.4% vs. 18.8%, p = .15) were reported significantly more often by women after CSA. For 20% of women after CSA, breastfeeding was a trigger for memories of CSA. Furthermore, 58% of women with CSA reported dissociation when breastfeeding.
CONCLUSION In addition to the growing list of potential health consequences of CSA experience, this experience seems to be associated with an increased number of problems when breastfeeding. However, most women with a history of CSA intend to breastfeed despite particular challenges related to CSA. A support protocol tailored to the specific needs of these women during pregnancy and the lactation period may help to improve breastfeeding and the early mother-child relationship.

Statistics

Citations

1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 30 Jan 2017
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 January 2017
Deposited On:30 Jan 2017 16:47
Last Modified:31 Jan 2017 02:04
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:0890-3344
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/0890334416680789
PubMed ID:28079443

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 443kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations