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Efficacy and safety of transcatheter closure in adults with large or small atrial septal defects


Meyer, Matthias R; Kurz, David J; Bernheim, Alain M; Kretschmar, Oliver; Eberli, Franz R (2016). Efficacy and safety of transcatheter closure in adults with large or small atrial septal defects. SpringerPlus, 5:1841.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In most patients with secundum atrial septal defects (ASD), transcatheter closure is the preferred treatment strategy, but whether device size affects clinical outcomes is unknown. We sought to study the efficacy and safety of large closure devices compared to the use of smaller devices.
METHODS: Using a single-center, prospective registry of adult patients undergoing transcatheter ASD closure, patients receiving a large closure device (waist diameter ≥25 mm, n = 41) were compared to patients receiving smaller devices (waist diameter ≤24 mm, n = 66). We analyzed pre-interventional clinical, hemodynamic and echocardiographic data, interventional success and complication rates, and 6-month clinical and echocardiographic outcomes. The primary efficacy outcome was successful ASD closure achieved by a single procedure and confirmed by lack of a significant residual shunt at 6 months. The primary safety outcome was a composite of device embolization, major bleeding, and new-onset atrial arrhythmia occurring within 6 months.
RESULTS: Transcatheter ASD closure using large devices was successful in 90 % compared to 97 % of patients receiving smaller devices as defined by the primary efficacy outcome (p = 0.20). The primary safety outcome occurred in 4 patients of the large and 6 patients of the small device group, resulting in an event-free rate of 90 and 91 %, respectively (p = 0.89). Similar significant symptomatic improvement was observed in both treatment groups after 6 months, indicated by a 50 % increase in the fraction of patients in NYHA class I (p < 0.0001 vs. baseline).
CONCLUSIONS: Transcatheter closure in this cohort of patients with large or small ASD was effective with similar complication rates during short-term follow-up irrespective of the size of the implanted device.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In most patients with secundum atrial septal defects (ASD), transcatheter closure is the preferred treatment strategy, but whether device size affects clinical outcomes is unknown. We sought to study the efficacy and safety of large closure devices compared to the use of smaller devices.
METHODS: Using a single-center, prospective registry of adult patients undergoing transcatheter ASD closure, patients receiving a large closure device (waist diameter ≥25 mm, n = 41) were compared to patients receiving smaller devices (waist diameter ≤24 mm, n = 66). We analyzed pre-interventional clinical, hemodynamic and echocardiographic data, interventional success and complication rates, and 6-month clinical and echocardiographic outcomes. The primary efficacy outcome was successful ASD closure achieved by a single procedure and confirmed by lack of a significant residual shunt at 6 months. The primary safety outcome was a composite of device embolization, major bleeding, and new-onset atrial arrhythmia occurring within 6 months.
RESULTS: Transcatheter ASD closure using large devices was successful in 90 % compared to 97 % of patients receiving smaller devices as defined by the primary efficacy outcome (p = 0.20). The primary safety outcome occurred in 4 patients of the large and 6 patients of the small device group, resulting in an event-free rate of 90 and 91 %, respectively (p = 0.89). Similar significant symptomatic improvement was observed in both treatment groups after 6 months, indicated by a 50 % increase in the fraction of patients in NYHA class I (p < 0.0001 vs. baseline).
CONCLUSIONS: Transcatheter closure in this cohort of patients with large or small ASD was effective with similar complication rates during short-term follow-up irrespective of the size of the implanted device.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:31 Jan 2017 09:18
Last Modified:10 Aug 2017 14:35
Publisher:SpringerOpen
ISSN:2193-1801
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s40064-016-3552-z
PubMed ID:27818879

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