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Postoperative amplitude-integrated electroencephalography predicts four-year neurodevelopmental outcome in children with complex congenital heart disease


Latal, Beatrice; Wohlrab, Gabriele; Brotschi, Barbara; Beck, Ingrid; Knirsch, Walter; Bernet, Vera (2016). Postoperative amplitude-integrated electroencephalography predicts four-year neurodevelopmental outcome in children with complex congenital heart disease. Journal of Pediatrics, 178:55-60.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the predictive value of pre- and postoperative amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) on neurodevelopmental outcomes in children operated for congenital heart disease (CHD).
STUDY DESIGN: Prospectively enrolled cohort of 60 infants with CHD who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass in the first 3 months of life. Infants with a genetic comorbidity were excluded. aEEG was assessed for 12 hours pre- and 48 hours postoperatively. Background pattern was classified by the use of standard categories, and the presence of seizures and sleep-wake cycles (SWCs) was noted. Outcome at 1 and 4 years of age was assessed with standardized developmental tests.
RESULTS: Preoperatively, infants either showed continuous normal voltage (n = 56) or discontinuous normal voltage (n = 4). Postoperatively, abnormal background pattern (flat trace, burst suppression, or continuous low voltage) was detected in 7 (12%), discontinuous normal voltage in 37 (61%), and continuous normal voltage in 16 (27%) infants. Nineteen infants (32%) did not return to normal SWCs within the recording period. Seizures were detected in 4 infants preoperatively and in another 4 postoperatively. After we controlled for surgical and postoperative risk factors, abnormal postoperative background pattern and lack of return to SWCs independently predicted poorer intelligence quotient at 4 years (P = .03 and P = .04 respectively) but was not related to motor outcome.
CONCLUSION: aEEG is a useful bedside tool that helps to predict outcome in infants undergoing open-heart surgery for CHD. Abnormal postoperative background pattern and lack of return to SWCs are markers for subsequent impaired cognitive development.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the predictive value of pre- and postoperative amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) on neurodevelopmental outcomes in children operated for congenital heart disease (CHD).
STUDY DESIGN: Prospectively enrolled cohort of 60 infants with CHD who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass in the first 3 months of life. Infants with a genetic comorbidity were excluded. aEEG was assessed for 12 hours pre- and 48 hours postoperatively. Background pattern was classified by the use of standard categories, and the presence of seizures and sleep-wake cycles (SWCs) was noted. Outcome at 1 and 4 years of age was assessed with standardized developmental tests.
RESULTS: Preoperatively, infants either showed continuous normal voltage (n = 56) or discontinuous normal voltage (n = 4). Postoperatively, abnormal background pattern (flat trace, burst suppression, or continuous low voltage) was detected in 7 (12%), discontinuous normal voltage in 37 (61%), and continuous normal voltage in 16 (27%) infants. Nineteen infants (32%) did not return to normal SWCs within the recording period. Seizures were detected in 4 infants preoperatively and in another 4 postoperatively. After we controlled for surgical and postoperative risk factors, abnormal postoperative background pattern and lack of return to SWCs independently predicted poorer intelligence quotient at 4 years (P = .03 and P = .04 respectively) but was not related to motor outcome.
CONCLUSION: aEEG is a useful bedside tool that helps to predict outcome in infants undergoing open-heart surgery for CHD. Abnormal postoperative background pattern and lack of return to SWCs are markers for subsequent impaired cognitive development.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:November 2016
Deposited On:02 Feb 2017 15:21
Last Modified:02 Feb 2017 15:22
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0022-3476
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.06.050
PubMed ID:27453368

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