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Ultrafiltration failure and impaired sodium sieving during long-term peritoneal dialysis: more than aquaporin dysfunction?


Morelle, J; Sow, A; Hautem, N; Devuyst, O; Goffin, E (2016). Ultrafiltration failure and impaired sodium sieving during long-term peritoneal dialysis: more than aquaporin dysfunction? Peritoneal Dialysis International, 36(2):227-231.

Abstract

Fifteen years ago, our group reported the case of a 67-year-old man on peritoneal dialysis for 11 years, in whom ultrafiltration failure and impaired sodium sieving were associated with an apparently normal expression of aquaporin-1 (AQP1) water channels in peritoneal capillaries. At that time, AQP1 dysfunction was suggested as the cause of impaired free-water transport. However, recent data from computer simulations, and structural and functional analysis of the peritoneal membrane of patients with encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis, demonstrated that changes in the peritoneal interstitium directly alter osmotic water transport. In light of these insights, we challenge the initial hypothesis and provide several lines of evidence supporting the diagnosis of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis in this patient and suggesting that severe peritoneal fibrosis accounted for the loss of osmotic conductance developed during the course of peritoneal dialysis.

Abstract

Fifteen years ago, our group reported the case of a 67-year-old man on peritoneal dialysis for 11 years, in whom ultrafiltration failure and impaired sodium sieving were associated with an apparently normal expression of aquaporin-1 (AQP1) water channels in peritoneal capillaries. At that time, AQP1 dysfunction was suggested as the cause of impaired free-water transport. However, recent data from computer simulations, and structural and functional analysis of the peritoneal membrane of patients with encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis, demonstrated that changes in the peritoneal interstitium directly alter osmotic water transport. In light of these insights, we challenge the initial hypothesis and provide several lines of evidence supporting the diagnosis of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis in this patient and suggesting that severe peritoneal fibrosis accounted for the loss of osmotic conductance developed during the course of peritoneal dialysis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:03 Feb 2017 11:42
Last Modified:03 Feb 2017 11:42
Publisher:Multimed Inc.
ISSN:0896-8608
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3747/pdi.2015.00188
PubMed ID:27006441

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