Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Clinical application of rehabilitation technologies in children undergoing neurorehabilitation


van Hedel, Hubertus J A; Aurich, Tabea (2016). Clinical application of rehabilitation technologies in children undergoing neurorehabilitation. In: Reinkensmeyer, David; Dietz, Volker. Neurorehabilitation Technology. Springer International Publishing: Springer International Publishing, 283-308.

Abstract

The application of rehabilitation technologies in children with neurological impairments appears promising as these systems can induce repetitive goal-directed movements to complement conventional treatments. Characteristics of robotic-supported and computer-assisted training are in line with principles of motor learning and include high numbers of repetitions, prolonged training durations, and online feedback about the patient’s active participation. When experienced therapists apply these technologies, they can be considered a rather safe and in combination with virtual realities a motivating supplementary approach. Therapists might have to take into account that there might be some factors that are different when applying such technologies to children with congenital versus acquired neurological lesions. Currently, clinical guidelines on how to apply such technologies are missing, and clinical evidence considering the effectiveness of such technologies has just started to commence in pediatric neurorehabilitation. Experienced therapists formulated recommendations that might be useful to those with less experience on how to apply some of these systems to train the lower and upper extremity intensively and playfully. Finally, suggestions are made on how these technologies could be integrated into the clinical path.

Abstract

The application of rehabilitation technologies in children with neurological impairments appears promising as these systems can induce repetitive goal-directed movements to complement conventional treatments. Characteristics of robotic-supported and computer-assisted training are in line with principles of motor learning and include high numbers of repetitions, prolonged training durations, and online feedback about the patient’s active participation. When experienced therapists apply these technologies, they can be considered a rather safe and in combination with virtual realities a motivating supplementary approach. Therapists might have to take into account that there might be some factors that are different when applying such technologies to children with congenital versus acquired neurological lesions. Currently, clinical guidelines on how to apply such technologies are missing, and clinical evidence considering the effectiveness of such technologies has just started to commence in pediatric neurorehabilitation. Experienced therapists formulated recommendations that might be useful to those with less experience on how to apply some of these systems to train the lower and upper extremity intensively and playfully. Finally, suggestions are made on how these technologies could be integrated into the clinical path.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 03 Feb 2017
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:03 Feb 2017 10:37
Last Modified:03 Feb 2017 10:39
Publisher:Springer International Publishing
ISBN:978-3-319-28601-3
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28603-7_14
Related URLs:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28603-7 (Publisher)

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations