Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The biological standard of living in Europe from the late iron age to the little ice age


Koepke, Nikola (2016). The biological standard of living in Europe from the late iron age to the little ice age. In: Komlos, J; Kelly, I. The Oxford Handbook of Economics and Human Biology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 70-109.

Abstract

This chapter documents human development in the very long run on the basis of anthropometric indicators used as a proxy measure of the biological standard of living. The author explores the trend in height of European populations, controlling for aspects of natural, economic, and social change. Findings include that there was a small increase in overall mean height in Europe from the 8th century BCE to the 18th century CE (c. 0.5 cm per millennium on average for the total dataset), with regional and temporal variations, including particular low points during Roman ascendancy (1st century BCE in Mediterranean Europe, 8 cm below the predicted mean) and the Little Ice Age (17th century CE in North-Eastern Europe, 7 cm below the predicted mean). Significant explanatory variables for these trends are the availability of dairy products, the share of the population living in urban areas, and the impact of the Roman Empire.

Abstract

This chapter documents human development in the very long run on the basis of anthropometric indicators used as a proxy measure of the biological standard of living. The author explores the trend in height of European populations, controlling for aspects of natural, economic, and social change. Findings include that there was a small increase in overall mean height in Europe from the 8th century BCE to the 18th century CE (c. 0.5 cm per millennium on average for the total dataset), with regional and temporal variations, including particular low points during Roman ascendancy (1st century BCE in Mediterranean Europe, 8 cm below the predicted mean) and the Little Ice Age (17th century CE in North-Eastern Europe, 7 cm below the predicted mean). Significant explanatory variables for these trends are the availability of dairy products, the share of the population living in urban areas, and the impact of the Roman Empire.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Evolutionary Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:Unspecified
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:03 Feb 2017 11:03
Last Modified:03 Feb 2017 11:03
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISBN:9780199389292
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199389292.013.34
Official URL:http://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/view/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199389292.001.0001/oxfordhb-9780199389292-e-34

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher