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Comparison of shear wave velocity measurements assessed with two different ultrasound systems in an ex-vivo tendon strain phantom


Rosskopf, A B; Bachmann, E; Snedeker, J G; Pfirrmann, C W; Buck, F M (2016). Comparison of shear wave velocity measurements assessed with two different ultrasound systems in an ex-vivo tendon strain phantom. Skeletal Radiology, 45(11):1541-1551.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to compare the reliability of SW velocity measurements of two different ultrasound systems and their correlation with the tangent traction modulus in a non-static tendon strain model.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: A bovine tendon was fixed in a custom-made stretching device. Force was applied increasing from 0 up to 18 Newton. During each strain state the tangent traction modulus was determined by the stretcher device, and SW velocity (m/s) measurements using a Siemens S3000 and a Supersonic Aixplorer US machine were done for shear modulus (kPa) calculation.
RESULTS: A strong significant positive correlation was found between SW velocity assessed by the two ultrasound systems and the tangent traction modulus (r = 0.827-0.954, p < 0.001), yet all SW velocity-based calculations underestimated the reference tissue tangent modulus. Mean difference of SW velocities with the S3000 was 0.44 ± 0.3 m/s (p = 0.002) and with the Aixplorer 0.25 ± 0.3 m/s (p = 0.034). Mean difference of SW velocity between the two US-systems was 0.37 ± 0.3 m/s (p = 0.012).
CONCLUSION: In conclusion, SW velocities are highly dependent on mechanical forces in the tendon tissue, but for controlled mechanical loads appear to yield reproducible and comparable measurements using different US systems.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to compare the reliability of SW velocity measurements of two different ultrasound systems and their correlation with the tangent traction modulus in a non-static tendon strain model.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: A bovine tendon was fixed in a custom-made stretching device. Force was applied increasing from 0 up to 18 Newton. During each strain state the tangent traction modulus was determined by the stretcher device, and SW velocity (m/s) measurements using a Siemens S3000 and a Supersonic Aixplorer US machine were done for shear modulus (kPa) calculation.
RESULTS: A strong significant positive correlation was found between SW velocity assessed by the two ultrasound systems and the tangent traction modulus (r = 0.827-0.954, p < 0.001), yet all SW velocity-based calculations underestimated the reference tissue tangent modulus. Mean difference of SW velocities with the S3000 was 0.44 ± 0.3 m/s (p = 0.002) and with the Aixplorer 0.25 ± 0.3 m/s (p = 0.034). Mean difference of SW velocity between the two US-systems was 0.37 ± 0.3 m/s (p = 0.012).
CONCLUSION: In conclusion, SW velocities are highly dependent on mechanical forces in the tendon tissue, but for controlled mechanical loads appear to yield reproducible and comparable measurements using different US systems.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Accuracy; Animal model; Shear modulus; Shear wave velocity; Sonoelastography; Stress
Language:English
Date:8 September 2016
Deposited On:02 Feb 2017 10:17
Last Modified:02 Feb 2018 11:58
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0364-2348
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00256-016-2470-z
PubMed ID:27631078

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