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Surface-driven collagen self-assembly affects early osteogenic stem cell signaling


Razafiarison, T; Silván, U; Meier, D; Snedeker, J G (2016). Surface-driven collagen self-assembly affects early osteogenic stem cell signaling. Advanced Healthcare Materials, 5(12):1481-1492.

Abstract

This study reports how extracellular matrix (ECM) ligand self-assembly on biomaterial surfaces and the resulting nanoscale architecture can drive stem cell behavior. To isolate the biological effects of surface wettability on protein deposition, folding, and ligand activity, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based platform was developed and characterized with the ability to tune wettability of elastomeric substrates with otherwise equivalent topology, ligand loading, and mechanical properties. Using this platform, markedly different assembly of covalently bound type I collagen monomers was observed depending on wettability, with hydrophobic substrates yielding a relatively rough layer of collagen aggregates compared to a smooth collagen layer on more hydrophilic substrates. Cellular and molecular investigations with human bone marrow stromal cells revealed higher osteogenic differentiation and upregulation of focal adhesion-related components on the resulting smooth collagen layer coated substrates. The initial collagen assembly driven by the PDMS surface directly affected α1β1 integrin/discoidin domain receptor 1 signaling, activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen activated protein kinase pathway, and ultimately markers of osteogenic stem cell differentiation. We demonstrate for the first time that surface-driven ligand assembly on material surfaces, even on materials with otherwise identical starting topographies and mechanical properties, can dominate the biomaterial surface-driven cell response.

Abstract

This study reports how extracellular matrix (ECM) ligand self-assembly on biomaterial surfaces and the resulting nanoscale architecture can drive stem cell behavior. To isolate the biological effects of surface wettability on protein deposition, folding, and ligand activity, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based platform was developed and characterized with the ability to tune wettability of elastomeric substrates with otherwise equivalent topology, ligand loading, and mechanical properties. Using this platform, markedly different assembly of covalently bound type I collagen monomers was observed depending on wettability, with hydrophobic substrates yielding a relatively rough layer of collagen aggregates compared to a smooth collagen layer on more hydrophilic substrates. Cellular and molecular investigations with human bone marrow stromal cells revealed higher osteogenic differentiation and upregulation of focal adhesion-related components on the resulting smooth collagen layer coated substrates. The initial collagen assembly driven by the PDMS surface directly affected α1β1 integrin/discoidin domain receptor 1 signaling, activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen activated protein kinase pathway, and ultimately markers of osteogenic stem cell differentiation. We demonstrate for the first time that surface-driven ligand assembly on material surfaces, even on materials with otherwise identical starting topographies and mechanical properties, can dominate the biomaterial surface-driven cell response.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:collagen monomer; hydrophobicity; nanotopographical cue; polydimethylsiloxane; stem cell
Language:English
Date:29 April 2016
Deposited On:02 Feb 2017 10:26
Last Modified:02 Feb 2017 10:26
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:2192-2640
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/adhm.201600128
PubMed ID:27125602

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