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Pulley ruptures in rock climbers: outcome of conservative treatment with the pulley-protection splint-a series of 47 cases


Schneeberger, M; Schweizer, A (2016). Pulley ruptures in rock climbers: outcome of conservative treatment with the pulley-protection splint-a series of 47 cases. Wilderness & environmental medicine, 27(2):211-218.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of conservative treatment of finger flexor tendon pulley rupture with a pulley-protection splint (PPS) with regard to reduction in tendon-phalanx distance (TPD) and functional and sport-specific outcomes in a retrospective case series.
METHODS: Tendon-phalanx distance in active forced flexion was measured before and after treatment in ultrasound records. Functional and sport-specific outcomes were evaluated by means of a questionnaire, which also contained instructions for self-measurement of finger range of motion and finger strength.
RESULTS: Forty-seven complete pulley ruptures in 45 rock climbers (mean age, 33.4 years; range, 21.8-56.2 years) were included in the study. In the 39 patients who had follow-up ultrasound examination, PPS treatment decreased mean ± SD TPD from 4.4 ± 1.0 mm to 2.3 ± 0.6 mm after A2 pulley rupture and from 2.9 ± 0.7 mm to 2.1 ± 0.5 mm after A4 pulley rupture. Tendon-phalanx distance was reduced in all patients. Finger range of motion (n = 42) and finger strength (n = 22) did not differ significantly between treated and contralateral sides. Of the 43 climbers who completed questionnaires, 38 had regained their previous climbing level a mean 8.8 months after pulley rupture; 1 reported reduced finger dexterity; 39 assessed their treatment results to be good, and 4 to be very good.
CONCLUSIONS: The PPS is an effective conservative treatment modality for pulley ruptures, which reduces TPD and enables the patient to regain previous finger function.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of conservative treatment of finger flexor tendon pulley rupture with a pulley-protection splint (PPS) with regard to reduction in tendon-phalanx distance (TPD) and functional and sport-specific outcomes in a retrospective case series.
METHODS: Tendon-phalanx distance in active forced flexion was measured before and after treatment in ultrasound records. Functional and sport-specific outcomes were evaluated by means of a questionnaire, which also contained instructions for self-measurement of finger range of motion and finger strength.
RESULTS: Forty-seven complete pulley ruptures in 45 rock climbers (mean age, 33.4 years; range, 21.8-56.2 years) were included in the study. In the 39 patients who had follow-up ultrasound examination, PPS treatment decreased mean ± SD TPD from 4.4 ± 1.0 mm to 2.3 ± 0.6 mm after A2 pulley rupture and from 2.9 ± 0.7 mm to 2.1 ± 0.5 mm after A4 pulley rupture. Tendon-phalanx distance was reduced in all patients. Finger range of motion (n = 42) and finger strength (n = 22) did not differ significantly between treated and contralateral sides. Of the 43 climbers who completed questionnaires, 38 had regained their previous climbing level a mean 8.8 months after pulley rupture; 1 reported reduced finger dexterity; 39 assessed their treatment results to be good, and 4 to be very good.
CONCLUSIONS: The PPS is an effective conservative treatment modality for pulley ruptures, which reduces TPD and enables the patient to regain previous finger function.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:bowstringing; finger injury; flexor tendon; pulley rupture; rock climbing
Language:English
Date:6 April 2016
Deposited On:02 Feb 2017 13:25
Last Modified:02 Feb 2017 13:25
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1080-6032
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2015.12.017

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