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Bioactive, elastic, and biodegradable emulsion electrospun degrapol tube delivering PDGF-BB for tendon rupture repair


Evrova, Olivera; Houska, Joanna; Welti, Manfred; Bonavoglia, Eliana; Calcagni, Maurizio; Giovanoli, Pietro; Vogel, Viola; Buschmann, Johanna (2016). Bioactive, elastic, and biodegradable emulsion electrospun degrapol tube delivering PDGF-BB for tendon rupture repair. Macromolecular Bioscience, 16(7):1048-63.

Abstract

Healing of tendon ruptures represents a major challenge in musculoskeletal injuries and combinations of biomaterials with biological factors are suggested as viable option for improved healing. The standard approach of repair by conventional suture leads to incomplete healing or rerupture. Here, a new elastic type of DegraPol® (DP), a polyester urethane, is explored as a delivery device for platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) to promote tendon healing. Using emulsion electrospinning as an easy method for incorporation of biomolecules within polymers, DegraPol® supports loading and release of PDGF-BB. Morphological, mechanical and delivery device properties of the bioactive DP scaffolds, as well as differences arising due to different electrospinning parameters are studied. Emulsion electrospun DP scaffolds result in thinner fibers than pure DP scaffolds and experience decreased strain at break [%], but high enough for successful surgeon handling. PDGF-BB is released in a sustained manner from emulsion electrospun DP, but not completely, with still large amount of it being inside the polymeric fibers after 30 d. In vitro studies show that the bioactive scaffolds promote tenocyte proliferation in serum free and serum(+) conditions, demonstrating the potential of this surgeon-friendly bioactive delivery device to be used for tendon repair.

Abstract

Healing of tendon ruptures represents a major challenge in musculoskeletal injuries and combinations of biomaterials with biological factors are suggested as viable option for improved healing. The standard approach of repair by conventional suture leads to incomplete healing or rerupture. Here, a new elastic type of DegraPol® (DP), a polyester urethane, is explored as a delivery device for platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) to promote tendon healing. Using emulsion electrospinning as an easy method for incorporation of biomolecules within polymers, DegraPol® supports loading and release of PDGF-BB. Morphological, mechanical and delivery device properties of the bioactive DP scaffolds, as well as differences arising due to different electrospinning parameters are studied. Emulsion electrospun DP scaffolds result in thinner fibers than pure DP scaffolds and experience decreased strain at break [%], but high enough for successful surgeon handling. PDGF-BB is released in a sustained manner from emulsion electrospun DP, but not completely, with still large amount of it being inside the polymeric fibers after 30 d. In vitro studies show that the bioactive scaffolds promote tenocyte proliferation in serum free and serum(+) conditions, demonstrating the potential of this surgeon-friendly bioactive delivery device to be used for tendon repair.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Reconstructive Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2016
Deposited On:06 Feb 2017 10:31
Last Modified:06 Feb 2017 10:32
Publisher:Wiley-VCH Verlag
ISSN:1616-5187
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/mabi.201500455
PubMed ID:27071839

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