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Adipose tissue-derived microvascular fragments improve vascularization, lymphangiogenesis, and integration of dermal skin substitutes


Frueh, Florian S; Später, Thomas; Lindenblatt, Nicole; Calcagni, Maurizio; Giovanoli, Pietro; Scheuer, Claudia; Menger, Michael D; Laschke, Matthias W (2017). Adipose tissue-derived microvascular fragments improve vascularization, lymphangiogenesis, and integration of dermal skin substitutes. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 137(1):217-227.

Abstract

Full-thickness skin defects can be covered with dermal skin substitutes in combination with split-thickness skin grafts. However, slow vascularization of the matrices bears the risk of wound infection and extends the length of hospitalization. To overcome these problems, we describe a promising vascularization strategy. Green fluorescent protein(+) adipose tissue-derived microvascular fragments (ad-MVF) were isolated from epididymal fat pads of C57BL/6-Tg(CAG-EGFP)1Osb/J mice. ad-MVF were seeded on collagen-glycosaminoglycan matrices, which were implanted into full-thickness skin defects in the dorsal skinfold chamber of wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Nonseeded matrices served as controls. Vascularization, lymphangiogenesis, and integration of the implants were studied by using intravital fluorescence microscopy, histology, and immunohistochemistry over 14 days. ad-MVF rapidly reassembled into microvascular networks within the implants, which developed interconnections to the host microvasculature. Accordingly, vascularization of the implants was markedly accelerated, as indicated by a significantly higher microvessel density when compared with controls. Moreover, dense lymphatic networks originating from the green fluorescent protein(+) ad-MVF developed within the implants. This was associated with an improved implant integration. Hence, seeding ad-MVF on collagen-glycosaminoglycan matrices represents a potential strategy to reduce morbidity and hospitalization of patients undergoing the treatment of full-thickness skin defects.

Abstract

Full-thickness skin defects can be covered with dermal skin substitutes in combination with split-thickness skin grafts. However, slow vascularization of the matrices bears the risk of wound infection and extends the length of hospitalization. To overcome these problems, we describe a promising vascularization strategy. Green fluorescent protein(+) adipose tissue-derived microvascular fragments (ad-MVF) were isolated from epididymal fat pads of C57BL/6-Tg(CAG-EGFP)1Osb/J mice. ad-MVF were seeded on collagen-glycosaminoglycan matrices, which were implanted into full-thickness skin defects in the dorsal skinfold chamber of wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Nonseeded matrices served as controls. Vascularization, lymphangiogenesis, and integration of the implants were studied by using intravital fluorescence microscopy, histology, and immunohistochemistry over 14 days. ad-MVF rapidly reassembled into microvascular networks within the implants, which developed interconnections to the host microvasculature. Accordingly, vascularization of the implants was markedly accelerated, as indicated by a significantly higher microvessel density when compared with controls. Moreover, dense lymphatic networks originating from the green fluorescent protein(+) ad-MVF developed within the implants. This was associated with an improved implant integration. Hence, seeding ad-MVF on collagen-glycosaminoglycan matrices represents a potential strategy to reduce morbidity and hospitalization of patients undergoing the treatment of full-thickness skin defects.

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1 citation in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Reconstructive Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:January 2017
Deposited On:06 Feb 2017 10:30
Last Modified:27 Aug 2017 05:33
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0022-202X
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jid.2016.08.010
PubMed ID:27574793

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