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Assessment of the isometry of the anterolateral ligament in a 3-dimensional weight-bearing computed tomography simulation


Wieser, Karl; Fürnstahl, Philipp; Carrillo, Fabio; Fucentese, Sandro F; Vlachopoulos, Lazaros (2017). Assessment of the isometry of the anterolateral ligament in a 3-dimensional weight-bearing computed tomography simulation. Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery, 33(5):1016-1023.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To simulate the most isometric insertion points of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) in a weight-bearing 3-dimensional computed tomography (CT) model using previously published anatomic landmarks and to define radiographic landmarks, which make for an easier identification of the optimal insertion points.
METHODS: The most isometric femoral insertion points were analyzed for 10 individuals, using data of weight-bearing CT scans in increasing knee flexion positions. An automatic string generation algorithm helped identify isometrically optimal points using an isometric score (0 indicating optimal isometry). Subsequently, a general femoral insertion point was determined, which preserved the isometry in all tested individuals. Based on the femoral insertion point, we assessed the influence of varying tibial insertion points on the isometric behavior of the ALL.
RESULTS: The defined femoral insertion point, which preserved the isometry in all analyzed individuals, had a median isometric score between 0.167 × 10(-3) and 0.559 × 10(-3). The average distance from the most prominent point of the lateral epicondyle was 9.7 mm (standard deviation [SD], 1.6) in a straight superior direction. In a straight lateral radiographic view, this point is located exactly at the intersection of a tangent set between the posterior cortex of the femur and a second perpendicular line intersecting at the level of the most (superior-) posterior point of the Blumensaat line. The best isometric behavior was found on the anatomically defined mean tibial insertion point, located at 37% of the width of the tibial plateau, which worsened gradually if corrected to anterior or posterior.
CONCLUSIONS: We determined femoral and tibial insertion points as well as radiographic landmarks for the reconstruction of the ALL that are based on published anatomic descriptions and preserve isometry in all analyzed individuals in this study.
CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This study provides new information, which might be helpful to define isometrically optimal insertion points for ALL reconstruction.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To simulate the most isometric insertion points of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) in a weight-bearing 3-dimensional computed tomography (CT) model using previously published anatomic landmarks and to define radiographic landmarks, which make for an easier identification of the optimal insertion points.
METHODS: The most isometric femoral insertion points were analyzed for 10 individuals, using data of weight-bearing CT scans in increasing knee flexion positions. An automatic string generation algorithm helped identify isometrically optimal points using an isometric score (0 indicating optimal isometry). Subsequently, a general femoral insertion point was determined, which preserved the isometry in all tested individuals. Based on the femoral insertion point, we assessed the influence of varying tibial insertion points on the isometric behavior of the ALL.
RESULTS: The defined femoral insertion point, which preserved the isometry in all analyzed individuals, had a median isometric score between 0.167 × 10(-3) and 0.559 × 10(-3). The average distance from the most prominent point of the lateral epicondyle was 9.7 mm (standard deviation [SD], 1.6) in a straight superior direction. In a straight lateral radiographic view, this point is located exactly at the intersection of a tangent set between the posterior cortex of the femur and a second perpendicular line intersecting at the level of the most (superior-) posterior point of the Blumensaat line. The best isometric behavior was found on the anatomically defined mean tibial insertion point, located at 37% of the width of the tibial plateau, which worsened gradually if corrected to anterior or posterior.
CONCLUSIONS: We determined femoral and tibial insertion points as well as radiographic landmarks for the reconstruction of the ALL that are based on published anatomic descriptions and preserve isometry in all analyzed individuals in this study.
CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This study provides new information, which might be helpful to define isometrically optimal insertion points for ALL reconstruction.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:12 January 2017
Deposited On:02 Feb 2017 13:37
Last Modified:03 May 2017 01:02
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0749-8063
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2016.11.005
PubMed ID:28089495

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