Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

IGF-1 and chondroitinase ABC augment nerve regeneration after vascularized composite limb allotransplantation


Kostereva, Nataliya V; Wang, Yong; Fletcher, Derek R; Unadkat, Jignesh V; Schnider, Jonas T; Komatsu, Chiaki; Yang, Yang; Stolz, Donna B; Davis, Michael R; Plock, Jan A; Gorantla, Vijay S (2016). IGF-1 and chondroitinase ABC augment nerve regeneration after vascularized composite limb allotransplantation. PLoS ONE, 11(6):e0156149.

Abstract

Impaired nerve regeneration and inadequate recovery of motor and sensory function following peripheral nerve repair remain the most significant hurdles to optimal functional and quality of life outcomes in vascularized tissue allotransplantation (VCA). Neurotherapeutics such as Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and chondroitinase ABC (CH) have shown promise in augmenting or accelerating nerve regeneration in experimental models and may have potential in VCA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of low dose IGF-1, CH or their combination (IGF-1+CH) on nerve regeneration following VCA. We used an allogeneic rat hind limb VCA model maintained on low-dose FK506 (tacrolimus) therapy to prevent rejection. Experimental animals received neurotherapeutics administered intra-operatively as multiple intraneural injections. The IGF-1 and IGF-1+CH groups received daily IGF-1 (intramuscular and intraneural injections). Histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate outcomes at five weeks. Overall, compared to controls, all experimental groups showed improvements in nerve and muscle (gastrocnemius) histomorphometry. The IGF-1 group demonstrated superior distal regeneration as confirmed by Schwann cell (SC) immunohistochemistry as well as some degree of extrafascicular regeneration. IGF-1 and CH effectively promote nerve regeneration after VCA as confirmed by histomorphometric and immunohistochemical outcomes.

Abstract

Impaired nerve regeneration and inadequate recovery of motor and sensory function following peripheral nerve repair remain the most significant hurdles to optimal functional and quality of life outcomes in vascularized tissue allotransplantation (VCA). Neurotherapeutics such as Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and chondroitinase ABC (CH) have shown promise in augmenting or accelerating nerve regeneration in experimental models and may have potential in VCA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of low dose IGF-1, CH or their combination (IGF-1+CH) on nerve regeneration following VCA. We used an allogeneic rat hind limb VCA model maintained on low-dose FK506 (tacrolimus) therapy to prevent rejection. Experimental animals received neurotherapeutics administered intra-operatively as multiple intraneural injections. The IGF-1 and IGF-1+CH groups received daily IGF-1 (intramuscular and intraneural injections). Histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate outcomes at five weeks. Overall, compared to controls, all experimental groups showed improvements in nerve and muscle (gastrocnemius) histomorphometry. The IGF-1 group demonstrated superior distal regeneration as confirmed by Schwann cell (SC) immunohistochemistry as well as some degree of extrafascicular regeneration. IGF-1 and CH effectively promote nerve regeneration after VCA as confirmed by histomorphometric and immunohistochemical outcomes.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Downloads

5 downloads since deposited on 06 Feb 2017
5 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Reconstructive Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:06 Feb 2017 10:18
Last Modified:17 Aug 2017 05:55
Publisher:Public Library of Science (PLoS)
ISSN:1932-6203
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0156149
PubMed ID:27272754

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 16MB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Public Domain Dedication: CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0)