Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Seasonal growth potential of rare lake water bacteria suggest their disproportional contribution to carbon fluxes


Neuenschwander, Stefan M; Pernthaler, Jakob; Posch, Thomas; Salcher, Michaela M (2014). Seasonal growth potential of rare lake water bacteria suggest their disproportional contribution to carbon fluxes. Environmental Microbiology, 17(3):781-795.

Abstract

We studied the seasonal growth potential of opportunistic bacterial populations in Lake Zurich (Switzerland) by a series of grazer-free dilution culture assays. Pronounced shifts in the composition of the bacterial assemblages were observed within one doubling of total cell numbers, from initially abundant Actinobacteria to other fast-growing microbial lineages. Small populations with growth potentials far above community average were detected throughout the year with striking seasonal differences in their respective taxonomic affiliations. Members of Cytophaga-Flavobacteria (CF) were disproportionally proliferating only during phytoplankton blooms in spring and summer, while Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria showed superior growth at all other occasions. Growth rates of Alphaproteobacteria and esp. Sphingomonadaceae were significantly correlated to water temperatures and were far above community average in summer. Within the genus Flavobacterium, two species-like populations showed a tendency for fast growth in most experiments, while four others were exclusively proliferating either during a spring or during a summer phytoplankton bloom. Their high growth potentials but low in situ abundances hint at a tight control by bacterivorous grazers and at a consequently accelerated carbon flux to higher trophic levels.

Abstract

We studied the seasonal growth potential of opportunistic bacterial populations in Lake Zurich (Switzerland) by a series of grazer-free dilution culture assays. Pronounced shifts in the composition of the bacterial assemblages were observed within one doubling of total cell numbers, from initially abundant Actinobacteria to other fast-growing microbial lineages. Small populations with growth potentials far above community average were detected throughout the year with striking seasonal differences in their respective taxonomic affiliations. Members of Cytophaga-Flavobacteria (CF) were disproportionally proliferating only during phytoplankton blooms in spring and summer, while Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria showed superior growth at all other occasions. Growth rates of Alphaproteobacteria and esp. Sphingomonadaceae were significantly correlated to water temperatures and were far above community average in summer. Within the genus Flavobacterium, two species-like populations showed a tendency for fast growth in most experiments, while four others were exclusively proliferating either during a spring or during a summer phytoplankton bloom. Their high growth potentials but low in situ abundances hint at a tight control by bacterivorous grazers and at a consequently accelerated carbon flux to higher trophic levels.

Statistics

Citations

15 citations in Web of Science®
15 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

5 downloads since deposited on 06 Feb 2017
5 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Plant and Microbial Biology
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:06 Feb 2017 13:31
Last Modified:06 Feb 2017 13:31
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1462-2912
Additional Information:For accepted manuscripts: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Neuenschwander, S. M., Pernthaler, J., Posch, T. and Salcher, M. M. (2015), Seasonal growth potential of rare lake water bacteria suggest their disproportional contribution to carbon fluxes. Environ Microbiol, 17: 781–795, which has been published in final form at doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.12520. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-820227.html#terms).
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.12520
PubMed ID:24903166

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 5MB
View at publisher