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Disruptive selection on male reproductive polymorphism in a jumping spider, Maevia inclemens


Busso, Juan Pablo; Davis Rabosky, Alison R (2016). Disruptive selection on male reproductive polymorphism in a jumping spider, Maevia inclemens. Animal Behaviour, 120:1-10.

Abstract

Genetic polymorphism in males has long been considered paradoxical because sexual selection is expected to deplete additive genetic variation. Although studies have shown how divergent selection between populations can make that work, it is very rare to find disruptive selection within one population. Since intersexual selection can have a significant effect on the phenotypic morphospace of the opposite sex, we analysed the role of female preference as a disruptive selective force. In this study we evaluated how female preference acts on anatomical and sex-related behavioural traits of two male morphs in the jumping spider Maevia inclemens. We used mate choice trials to analyse how female preference for the two morphs varied. The tests indicated that females preferred opposite values of two anatomical and two behavioural traits for each male morph. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to show disruptive sexual selection in Arachnidae and significantly expands the realm of disruptive selection, by adding one more case to the very few documented instances. These processes, which act entirely within a species, are of particular interest because they could contribute to the evolution of reproductive isolation and sympatric speciation by sexual selection, a controversial topic in evolutionary biology.

Abstract

Genetic polymorphism in males has long been considered paradoxical because sexual selection is expected to deplete additive genetic variation. Although studies have shown how divergent selection between populations can make that work, it is very rare to find disruptive selection within one population. Since intersexual selection can have a significant effect on the phenotypic morphospace of the opposite sex, we analysed the role of female preference as a disruptive selective force. In this study we evaluated how female preference acts on anatomical and sex-related behavioural traits of two male morphs in the jumping spider Maevia inclemens. We used mate choice trials to analyse how female preference for the two morphs varied. The tests indicated that females preferred opposite values of two anatomical and two behavioural traits for each male morph. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to show disruptive sexual selection in Arachnidae and significantly expands the realm of disruptive selection, by adding one more case to the very few documented instances. These processes, which act entirely within a species, are of particular interest because they could contribute to the evolution of reproductive isolation and sympatric speciation by sexual selection, a controversial topic in evolutionary biology.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:07 Feb 2017 13:25
Last Modified:07 Feb 2017 14:56
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0003-3472
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.07.028

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