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Patient survival after simultaneous ALPPS and colorectal resection


Wanis, Kerollos Nashat; Buac, Suzana; Linecker, Michael; Ardiles, Victoria; Tun-Abraham, Mauro Enrique; Robles-Campos, Ricardo; Malago, Massimo; de Santibañes, Eduardo; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Hernandez-Alejandro, Roberto (2017). Patient survival after simultaneous ALPPS and colorectal resection. World Journal of Surgery, 41(4):1119-1125.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Liver resection combined with colorectal surgery (CRS) is the only curative option in many patients presenting with synchronous colorectal cancer and liver metastases (CRLM). Simultaneous resection has been shown to offer benefits in patients with low hepatic tumor load; however, in the setting of in situ colorectal tumor with extensive CRLM and a small predicted future liver remnant (FLR), the use of simultaneous ALPPS and CRS is controversial, lacking outcome data.
METHODS: Thirty-one cases of simultaneous ALPPS and CRS prospectively entered into the International ALPPS Registry were examined. Univariate analysis was used to identify factors associated with 90-day mortality after stage-2.
RESULTS: Thirty patients (97%) completed both stages. CRS was performed during stage-1 in 22 patients (73%). Seven patients (23%) had severe complications (Clavien-Dindo ≥ IIIb) following stage-2 ALPPS. The 90-day mortality rate was 15%. Patients who had a severe complication after stage-1 were significantly more likely to have 90-day mortality following stage-2 (p = 0.002). MELD score > 10 on postoperative day-5 after stage-1 was also significantly associated with 90-day mortality (p = 0.011). Disease-free survival and overall survival were 36% and 76% at 1 year, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS: In light of the high mortality and poor long-term survival identified in this series, the adoption of ALPPS with CRS cannot be recommended without further data. Patients who suffer severe complications or have an elevated MELD score after stage-1 are at higher risk of mortality following stage-2.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Liver resection combined with colorectal surgery (CRS) is the only curative option in many patients presenting with synchronous colorectal cancer and liver metastases (CRLM). Simultaneous resection has been shown to offer benefits in patients with low hepatic tumor load; however, in the setting of in situ colorectal tumor with extensive CRLM and a small predicted future liver remnant (FLR), the use of simultaneous ALPPS and CRS is controversial, lacking outcome data.
METHODS: Thirty-one cases of simultaneous ALPPS and CRS prospectively entered into the International ALPPS Registry were examined. Univariate analysis was used to identify factors associated with 90-day mortality after stage-2.
RESULTS: Thirty patients (97%) completed both stages. CRS was performed during stage-1 in 22 patients (73%). Seven patients (23%) had severe complications (Clavien-Dindo ≥ IIIb) following stage-2 ALPPS. The 90-day mortality rate was 15%. Patients who had a severe complication after stage-1 were significantly more likely to have 90-day mortality following stage-2 (p = 0.002). MELD score > 10 on postoperative day-5 after stage-1 was also significantly associated with 90-day mortality (p = 0.011). Disease-free survival and overall survival were 36% and 76% at 1 year, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS: In light of the high mortality and poor long-term survival identified in this series, the adoption of ALPPS with CRS cannot be recommended without further data. Patients who suffer severe complications or have an elevated MELD score after stage-1 are at higher risk of mortality following stage-2.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:13 Feb 2017 08:22
Last Modified:09 Mar 2017 02:04
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0364-2313
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00268-016-3818-1
PubMed ID:27837237

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