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Optical coherence tomography evaluation of intermediate-term healing of different stent types: systemic review and meta-analysis


Iannaccone, Mario; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Templin, Christian; Omedè, Pierluigi; Montefusco, Antonio; Guagliumi, Giulio; Serruys, Patrick W; Di Mario, Carlo; Kochman, Janusz; Quadri, Giorgio; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Lüscher, Thomas F; Moretti, Claudio; D'amico, Maurizio; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Stone, Gregg W (2016). Optical coherence tomography evaluation of intermediate-term healing of different stent types: systemic review and meta-analysis. European Heart Journal. Cardiovascular Imaging, 18(2):159-166.

Abstract

AIMS: The intermediate-term incidence of strut malapposition (SM) and uncovered struts (US), and the degree of neointimal thickness (NIT) according to stent type have not been characterized.
METHODS AND RESULTS: All studies of >50 patients in which optical coherence tomography was performed between 6 and 12 months after stent implantation were included. The incidences of SM and US were the co-primary end points, while NIT was the secondary end point. A total of 458 citations were initially appraised at the abstract level, and 11 full-text studies (280 652 analysed struts, 921 patients) were assessed. The 6-12 months incidences of SM and US were 5.0 and 7.8%, respectively, and the mean NIT was 206 μm. Biolimus-eluting stents (BES) and bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS) had the highest SM rates (2.7 and 3.8%, respectively), while everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and fast-release zotarolimus-eluting stents (ZES) had the lowest SM rates (0.9 and 0.1%, respectively). BES and sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) had the highest US rates (7.7 and 8.8%, respectively), while bare metal stents (BMS) and ZES had the lowest US rates (0.3 and 0.3%, respectively). BMS had the greatest NIT (340 μm), while SES, EES, and BES had the least NIT.
CONCLUSION: Second-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have better intermediate-term strut apposition and coverage than first-generation DES, BVS, and BMS. EES demonstrate the overall best combination of healing with suppression of neointimal hyperplasia at 6-12 months. Further studies with clinical correlation are warranted to determine the implications of these findings.

Abstract

AIMS: The intermediate-term incidence of strut malapposition (SM) and uncovered struts (US), and the degree of neointimal thickness (NIT) according to stent type have not been characterized.
METHODS AND RESULTS: All studies of >50 patients in which optical coherence tomography was performed between 6 and 12 months after stent implantation were included. The incidences of SM and US were the co-primary end points, while NIT was the secondary end point. A total of 458 citations were initially appraised at the abstract level, and 11 full-text studies (280 652 analysed struts, 921 patients) were assessed. The 6-12 months incidences of SM and US were 5.0 and 7.8%, respectively, and the mean NIT was 206 μm. Biolimus-eluting stents (BES) and bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS) had the highest SM rates (2.7 and 3.8%, respectively), while everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and fast-release zotarolimus-eluting stents (ZES) had the lowest SM rates (0.9 and 0.1%, respectively). BES and sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) had the highest US rates (7.7 and 8.8%, respectively), while bare metal stents (BMS) and ZES had the lowest US rates (0.3 and 0.3%, respectively). BMS had the greatest NIT (340 μm), while SES, EES, and BES had the least NIT.
CONCLUSION: Second-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have better intermediate-term strut apposition and coverage than first-generation DES, BVS, and BMS. EES demonstrate the overall best combination of healing with suppression of neointimal hyperplasia at 6-12 months. Further studies with clinical correlation are warranted to determine the implications of these findings.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:February 2016
Deposited On:06 Feb 2017 15:17
Last Modified:09 Apr 2017 05:39
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:2047-2404
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/ehjci/jew070
PubMed ID:27099274

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