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The early development of wheeze. environmental determinants and genetic susceptibility at 17q21


Abstract

RATIONALE: Growing up on a farm protects from childhood asthma and early wheeze. Virus-triggered wheeze in infancy predicts asthma in individuals with a genetic asthma risk associated with chromosome 17q21.
OBJECTIVES: To test environmental determinants of infections and wheeze in the first year of life, potential modifications of these associations by 17q21, and the implications for different trajectories of wheeze.
METHODS: We followed 983 children in rural areas of Europe from birth until age 6 years. Symptoms of wheeze, rhinitis, fever, and environmental exposures were documented with weekly diaries during year 1. Asthma at age 6 was defined as ever having a reported doctor's diagnosis. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms related to ORMDL3 (rs8076131) and GSDMB (rs7216389, rs2290400) at 17q21 were genotyped.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Early wheeze was positively associated with presence of older siblings among carriers of known asthma risk alleles at 17q21 (e.g., rs8076131) (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-2.01). Exposure to farm animal sheds was inversely related to wheeze (aOR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.33-0.60). Both effects were similarly observed in children with transient wheeze up to age 3 years without subsequent development of asthma (aOR, 1.71 [95% CI, 1.09-2.67]; and aOR, 0.48 [95% CI, 0.30-0.76], respectively).
CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the chromosome 17q21 locus relates to episodes of acute airway obstruction common to both transient wheeze and asthma. The previously identified asthma risk alleles are the ones susceptible to environmental influences. Thus, this gene-environment interaction reveals two faces of 17q21: The same genotype constitutes genetic risk and allows for environmental protection, thereby providing options for prospective prevention strategies.

Abstract

RATIONALE: Growing up on a farm protects from childhood asthma and early wheeze. Virus-triggered wheeze in infancy predicts asthma in individuals with a genetic asthma risk associated with chromosome 17q21.
OBJECTIVES: To test environmental determinants of infections and wheeze in the first year of life, potential modifications of these associations by 17q21, and the implications for different trajectories of wheeze.
METHODS: We followed 983 children in rural areas of Europe from birth until age 6 years. Symptoms of wheeze, rhinitis, fever, and environmental exposures were documented with weekly diaries during year 1. Asthma at age 6 was defined as ever having a reported doctor's diagnosis. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms related to ORMDL3 (rs8076131) and GSDMB (rs7216389, rs2290400) at 17q21 were genotyped.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Early wheeze was positively associated with presence of older siblings among carriers of known asthma risk alleles at 17q21 (e.g., rs8076131) (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-2.01). Exposure to farm animal sheds was inversely related to wheeze (aOR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.33-0.60). Both effects were similarly observed in children with transient wheeze up to age 3 years without subsequent development of asthma (aOR, 1.71 [95% CI, 1.09-2.67]; and aOR, 0.48 [95% CI, 0.30-0.76], respectively).
CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the chromosome 17q21 locus relates to episodes of acute airway obstruction common to both transient wheeze and asthma. The previously identified asthma risk alleles are the ones susceptible to environmental influences. Thus, this gene-environment interaction reveals two faces of 17q21: The same genotype constitutes genetic risk and allows for environmental protection, thereby providing options for prospective prevention strategies.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:15 April 2016
Deposited On:10 Feb 2017 10:54
Last Modified:10 Feb 2017 18:33
Publisher:American Thoracic Society
ISSN:1073-449X
Additional Information:Originally Published in: Loss et al: The Early Development of Wheeze. Environmental Determinants and Genetic Susceptibility at 17q21, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 193, No. 8 | Apr 15, 2016 DOI: 10.1164/rccm.201507-1493OC Copyright © 2016 by the American Thoracic Society. The final publication is available at http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/10.1164/rccm.201507-1493OC.
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201507-1493OC
PubMed ID:26575599

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