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Rivaroxaban for thromboprophylaxis after nonelective orthopedic trauma surgery in Switzerland


Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Simmen, Hanspeter; Jakob, Marcel; Sommer, Christoph; Platz, Andreas; Ilchmann, Thomas; Grossen, Erik; Ryf, Christian; Christofilopoulos, Panayiotis; Schueler, Michael; Lassen, Michael Rud; Rimle, Markus; Gasser, Urs E (2017). Rivaroxaban for thromboprophylaxis after nonelective orthopedic trauma surgery in Switzerland. Orthopedics, 40(2):109-116.

Abstract

This study investigated the effectiveness and the outcomes of rivaroxaban vs the standard of care for venous thromboembolic prophylaxis in patients undergoing fracture-related surgery. A total of 413 patients undergoing fracture-related surgery from 9 Swiss orthopedic and trauma centers were enrolled. The authors selected the type of venous thromboembolic prophylaxis according to standardized medical practice at the participating centers before the inclusion of patients: 208 patients received rivaroxaban and 205 received the standard of care. Data on symptomatic thromboembolic and bleeding events, surgery-related complications, death, adverse events, time to mobilization, and hospital discharge were collected. Symptomatic thromboembolic events were reported in 1 patient (0.5%) and 2 patients (1.0%) and treatment-emergent major bleeding events were reported in 1 patient (0.5%) and 2 patients (1.0%) receiving rivaroxaban and the standard of care, respectively. The durations of hospital stay and venous thromboembolic prophylaxis were similar in the 2 groups. In both groups, adverse events related to venous thromboembolic prophylaxis were reported in 12 patients. The proportion of patients with minor and major fracture surgery was 74.3% and 25.7%, respectively. In patients undergoing minor fracture surgery receiving rivaroxaban (n=167) and the standard of care (n=140), no symptomatic thromboembolic events and no major bleeding events were reported. Outcomes of this study indicate that rivaroxaban might be an appropriate oral alternative for venous thromboembolic prophylaxis in routine medical care after fracture-related major and minor surgery. Reported results were comparable to those from other large-scale, noninterventional and randomized controlled studies.

Abstract

This study investigated the effectiveness and the outcomes of rivaroxaban vs the standard of care for venous thromboembolic prophylaxis in patients undergoing fracture-related surgery. A total of 413 patients undergoing fracture-related surgery from 9 Swiss orthopedic and trauma centers were enrolled. The authors selected the type of venous thromboembolic prophylaxis according to standardized medical practice at the participating centers before the inclusion of patients: 208 patients received rivaroxaban and 205 received the standard of care. Data on symptomatic thromboembolic and bleeding events, surgery-related complications, death, adverse events, time to mobilization, and hospital discharge were collected. Symptomatic thromboembolic events were reported in 1 patient (0.5%) and 2 patients (1.0%) and treatment-emergent major bleeding events were reported in 1 patient (0.5%) and 2 patients (1.0%) receiving rivaroxaban and the standard of care, respectively. The durations of hospital stay and venous thromboembolic prophylaxis were similar in the 2 groups. In both groups, adverse events related to venous thromboembolic prophylaxis were reported in 12 patients. The proportion of patients with minor and major fracture surgery was 74.3% and 25.7%, respectively. In patients undergoing minor fracture surgery receiving rivaroxaban (n=167) and the standard of care (n=140), no symptomatic thromboembolic events and no major bleeding events were reported. Outcomes of this study indicate that rivaroxaban might be an appropriate oral alternative for venous thromboembolic prophylaxis in routine medical care after fracture-related major and minor surgery. Reported results were comparable to those from other large-scale, noninterventional and randomized controlled studies.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Trauma Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:13 Feb 2017 09:58
Last Modified:25 Mar 2017 02:03
Publisher:Slack
ISSN:0147-7447
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3928/01477447-20161116-05
PubMed ID:27874908

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