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Hyperinflammation in patients with chronic granulomatous disease leads to impairment of hematopoietic stem cell functions


Weisser, Maren; Demel, Uta M; Stein, Stefan; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Touzot, Fabien; Santilli, Giorgia; Sujer, Stefanie; Brendel, Christian; Siler, Ulrich; Cavazzana, Marina; Thrasher, Adrian J; Reichenbach, Janine; Essers, Marieke A G; Schwäble, Joachim; Grez, Manuel (2016). Hyperinflammation in patients with chronic granulomatous disease leads to impairment of hematopoietic stem cell functions. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 138(1):219-228.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Defects in phagocytic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2 (NOX2) function cause chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), a primary immunodeficiency characterized by dysfunctional microbicidal activity and chronic inflammation.
OBJECTIVE: We sought to study the effect of chronic inflammation on the hematopoietic compartment in patients and mice with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD).
METHODS: We used immunostaining and functional analyses to study the hematopoietic compartment in patients with CGD.
RESULTS: An analysis of bone marrow cells from patients and mice with X-CGD revealed a dysregulated hematopoiesis characterized by increased numbers of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) at the expense of repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). In patients with X-CGD, there was a clear reduction in the proportion of HSCs in bone marrow and peripheral blood, and they were also more rapidly exhausted after in vitro culture. In mice with X-CGD, increased cycling of HSCs, expansion of HPCs, and impaired long-term engraftment capacity were found to be associated with high concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β. Treatment of wild-type mice with IL-1β induced enhanced cell-cycle entry of HSCs, expansion of HPCs, and defects in long-term engraftment, mimicking the effects observed in mice with X-CGD. Inhibition of cytokine signaling in mice with X-CGD reduced HPC numbers but had only minor effects on the repopulating ability of HSCs.
CONCLUSIONS: Persistent chronic inflammation in patients with CGD is associated with hematopoietic proliferative stress, leading to a decrease in the functional activity of HSCs. Our observations have clinical implications for the development of successful autologous cell therapy approaches.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Defects in phagocytic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2 (NOX2) function cause chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), a primary immunodeficiency characterized by dysfunctional microbicidal activity and chronic inflammation.
OBJECTIVE: We sought to study the effect of chronic inflammation on the hematopoietic compartment in patients and mice with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD).
METHODS: We used immunostaining and functional analyses to study the hematopoietic compartment in patients with CGD.
RESULTS: An analysis of bone marrow cells from patients and mice with X-CGD revealed a dysregulated hematopoiesis characterized by increased numbers of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) at the expense of repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). In patients with X-CGD, there was a clear reduction in the proportion of HSCs in bone marrow and peripheral blood, and they were also more rapidly exhausted after in vitro culture. In mice with X-CGD, increased cycling of HSCs, expansion of HPCs, and impaired long-term engraftment capacity were found to be associated with high concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β. Treatment of wild-type mice with IL-1β induced enhanced cell-cycle entry of HSCs, expansion of HPCs, and defects in long-term engraftment, mimicking the effects observed in mice with X-CGD. Inhibition of cytokine signaling in mice with X-CGD reduced HPC numbers but had only minor effects on the repopulating ability of HSCs.
CONCLUSIONS: Persistent chronic inflammation in patients with CGD is associated with hematopoietic proliferative stress, leading to a decrease in the functional activity of HSCs. Our observations have clinical implications for the development of successful autologous cell therapy approaches.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2016
Deposited On:10 Feb 2017 10:19
Last Modified:12 Feb 2017 06:10
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0091-6749
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2015.11.028
PubMed ID:26853280

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