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Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy: Electrical and Structural Phenotypes


Akdis, Deniz; Brunckhorst, Corinna; Duru, Firat; Saguner, Ardan M (2016). Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy: Electrical and Structural Phenotypes. Arrhythmia & electrophysiology review, 5(2):90-101.

Abstract

This overview gives an update on the molecular mechanisms, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM). ACM is mostly hereditary and associated with mutations in genes encoding proteins of the intercalated disc. Three subtypes have been proposed: the classical right-dominant subtype generally referred to as ARVC/D, biventricular forms with early biventricular involvement and left-dominant subtypes with predominant LV involvement. Typical symptoms include palpitations, arrhythmic (pre)syncope and sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias, which typically occur in athletes. At later stages, heart failure may occur. Diagnosis is established with the 2010 Task Force Criteria (TFC). Modern imaging tools are crucial for ACM diagnosis, including both echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for detecting functional and structural alternations. Of note, structural findings often become visible after electrical alterations, such as premature ventricular beats, ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT). 12-lead ECG is important to assess for depolarisation and repolarisation abnormalities, including T-wave inversions as the most common ECG abnormality. Family history and the detection of causative mutations, mostly affecting the desmosome, have been incorporated in the TFC, and stress the importance of cascade family screening. Differential diagnoses include idiopathic right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) VT, sarcoidosis, congenital heart disease, myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, athlete's heart, Brugada syndrome and RV infarction. Therapeutic strategies include restriction from endurance and competitive sports, β-blockers, antiarrhythmic drugs, heart failure medication, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and endocardial/epicardial catheter ablation.

Abstract

This overview gives an update on the molecular mechanisms, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM). ACM is mostly hereditary and associated with mutations in genes encoding proteins of the intercalated disc. Three subtypes have been proposed: the classical right-dominant subtype generally referred to as ARVC/D, biventricular forms with early biventricular involvement and left-dominant subtypes with predominant LV involvement. Typical symptoms include palpitations, arrhythmic (pre)syncope and sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias, which typically occur in athletes. At later stages, heart failure may occur. Diagnosis is established with the 2010 Task Force Criteria (TFC). Modern imaging tools are crucial for ACM diagnosis, including both echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for detecting functional and structural alternations. Of note, structural findings often become visible after electrical alterations, such as premature ventricular beats, ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT). 12-lead ECG is important to assess for depolarisation and repolarisation abnormalities, including T-wave inversions as the most common ECG abnormality. Family history and the detection of causative mutations, mostly affecting the desmosome, have been incorporated in the TFC, and stress the importance of cascade family screening. Differential diagnoses include idiopathic right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) VT, sarcoidosis, congenital heart disease, myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, athlete's heart, Brugada syndrome and RV infarction. Therapeutic strategies include restriction from endurance and competitive sports, β-blockers, antiarrhythmic drugs, heart failure medication, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and endocardial/epicardial catheter ablation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2016
Deposited On:10 Feb 2017 11:43
Last Modified:10 Feb 2017 12:45
Publisher:Radcliffe Medical Press
ISSN:2050-3369
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.15420/AER.2016.4.3
PubMed ID:27617087

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