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Important role of endocannabinoid signaling in the development of functional vision and locomotion in zebrafish


Martella, Andrea; Sepe, Rosa M; Silvestri, Cristoforo; Zang, Jingjing; Fasano, Giulia; Carnevali, Oliana; De Girolamo, Paolo; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Sordino, Paolo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo (2016). Important role of endocannabinoid signaling in the development of functional vision and locomotion in zebrafish. FASEB Journal, 30(12):4275-4288.

Abstract

The developmental role of the endocannabinoid system still remains to be fully understood. Here, we report the presence of a complete endocannabinoid system during zebrafish development and show that the genes that code for enzymes that catalyze the anabolism and catabolism (mgll and dagla) of the endocannabinoid, 2-AG (2-arachidonoylglycerol), as well as 2-AG main receptor in the brain, cannabinoid receptor type 1, are coexpressed in defined regions of axonal growth. By using morpholino-induced transient knockdown of the zebrafish Daglα homolog and its pharmacologic rescue, we suggest that synthesis of 2-AG is implicated in the control of axon formation in the midbrain-hindbrain region and that animals that lack Daglα display abnormal physiological behaviors in tests that measure stereotyped movement and motion perception. Our results suggest that the well-established role for 2-AG in axonal outgrowth has implications for the control of vision and movement in zebrafish and, thus, is likely common to all vertebrates.-Martella, A., Sepe, R. M., Silvestri, C., Zang, J., Fasano, G., Carnevali, O., De Girolamo, P., Neuhauss, S. C. F., Sordino, P., Di Marzo, V. Important role of endocannabinoid signaling in the development of functional vision and locomotion in zebrafish.

Abstract

The developmental role of the endocannabinoid system still remains to be fully understood. Here, we report the presence of a complete endocannabinoid system during zebrafish development and show that the genes that code for enzymes that catalyze the anabolism and catabolism (mgll and dagla) of the endocannabinoid, 2-AG (2-arachidonoylglycerol), as well as 2-AG main receptor in the brain, cannabinoid receptor type 1, are coexpressed in defined regions of axonal growth. By using morpholino-induced transient knockdown of the zebrafish Daglα homolog and its pharmacologic rescue, we suggest that synthesis of 2-AG is implicated in the control of axon formation in the midbrain-hindbrain region and that animals that lack Daglα display abnormal physiological behaviors in tests that measure stereotyped movement and motion perception. Our results suggest that the well-established role for 2-AG in axonal outgrowth has implications for the control of vision and movement in zebrafish and, thus, is likely common to all vertebrates.-Martella, A., Sepe, R. M., Silvestri, C., Zang, J., Fasano, G., Carnevali, O., De Girolamo, P., Neuhauss, S. C. F., Sordino, P., Di Marzo, V. Important role of endocannabinoid signaling in the development of functional vision and locomotion in zebrafish.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Life Sciences
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:31 December 2016
Deposited On:10 Feb 2017 13:33
Last Modified:12 Feb 2017 07:08
Publisher:Federation of American Society of Experimental Biology
ISSN:0892-6638
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1096/fj.201600602R
PubMed ID:27623930

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