Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The role of recipient derived interleukin-17A in a murine orthotopic lung transplant model of restrictive chronic lung allograft dysfunction


Yamada, Y; Vandermeulen, E; Heigl, T; Somers, J; Vaneylen, A; Verleden, S E; Bellon, H; De Vleeschauwer, S; Verbeken, E K; Van Raemdonck, D E; Vos, R; Verleden, G M; Jungraithmayr, W; Vanaudenaerde, B M (2016). The role of recipient derived interleukin-17A in a murine orthotopic lung transplant model of restrictive chronic lung allograft dysfunction. Transplant immunology, 39:10-17.

Abstract

The single most important cause of late mortality after lung transplantation is chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). However, the pathological development of CLAD was not as simple as previously presumed and subclassification phenotypes, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) and restrictive CLAD (rCLAD), have been introduced. We want to re-investigate how CLAD manifests in the murine orthotopic lung transplant model and investigate the role of interleukin 17A (IL-17A) within this model. Orthotopic LTx was performed in CB57BL/6, IL-17 WT and IL-17 KO mice. In a first experiment, CB57BL/6 mice receiving an isograft (CB57BL/6) or allograft (BALB/C) were compared. In a second experiment IL-17 WT and IL-17 KO mice (both CB57BL/6 background) received an allograft (BALB/C). Mice received daily immunosuppression with steroids and cyclosporine and were sacrificed 10weeks after transplantation for histopathological analysis by an experienced lung pathologist. After murine orthotopic lung transplantation, the allograft histopathologically presented features of human rCLAD (i.e. overt inflammation, pleural/parenchymal fibrosis and obliterative bronchiolitis). In the IL-17A KO group, less inflammation in the bronchovascular axis (p=0.03) was observed and a non-significant trend towards less bronchovascular fibrosis, pleural/septal inflammation and fibrosis, and parenchymal inflammation and fibrosis when compared to WT mice. The major mismatch orthotopic lung transplant model resembles features of human rCLAD. IL-17A mediated immunity is involved in the inflammatory component, but had little influence on the degree of fibrosis. Further mechanistic and therapeutic studies in this mouse model are needed to fully understand the mechanisms in rCLAD.

Abstract

The single most important cause of late mortality after lung transplantation is chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). However, the pathological development of CLAD was not as simple as previously presumed and subclassification phenotypes, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) and restrictive CLAD (rCLAD), have been introduced. We want to re-investigate how CLAD manifests in the murine orthotopic lung transplant model and investigate the role of interleukin 17A (IL-17A) within this model. Orthotopic LTx was performed in CB57BL/6, IL-17 WT and IL-17 KO mice. In a first experiment, CB57BL/6 mice receiving an isograft (CB57BL/6) or allograft (BALB/C) were compared. In a second experiment IL-17 WT and IL-17 KO mice (both CB57BL/6 background) received an allograft (BALB/C). Mice received daily immunosuppression with steroids and cyclosporine and were sacrificed 10weeks after transplantation for histopathological analysis by an experienced lung pathologist. After murine orthotopic lung transplantation, the allograft histopathologically presented features of human rCLAD (i.e. overt inflammation, pleural/parenchymal fibrosis and obliterative bronchiolitis). In the IL-17A KO group, less inflammation in the bronchovascular axis (p=0.03) was observed and a non-significant trend towards less bronchovascular fibrosis, pleural/septal inflammation and fibrosis, and parenchymal inflammation and fibrosis when compared to WT mice. The major mismatch orthotopic lung transplant model resembles features of human rCLAD. IL-17A mediated immunity is involved in the inflammatory component, but had little influence on the degree of fibrosis. Further mechanistic and therapeutic studies in this mouse model are needed to fully understand the mechanisms in rCLAD.

Statistics

Citations

2 citations in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 14 Feb 2017
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Thoracic Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:November 2016
Deposited On:14 Feb 2017 14:02
Last Modified:14 Feb 2017 14:02
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0966-3274
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trim.2016.10.001
PubMed ID:27737799

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher