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Evaluation of intraarterial and intravenous cisplatin chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic osteosarcoma using an orthotopic xenograft mouse model


Robl, Bernhard; Botter, Sander Martijn; Pellegrini, Giovanni; Neklyudova, Olga; Fuchs, Bruno (2016). Evaluation of intraarterial and intravenous cisplatin chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic osteosarcoma using an orthotopic xenograft mouse model. Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, 35(1):online.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of bone. Its treatment relies on the administration of neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy combined with surgery. Alternative to common intravenous (i.v.) administration of chemotherapeutic drugs, clinical studies also evaluated the benefit of intraarterial (i.a.) administrations. However, conflicting results were obtained when both routes of administration of cisplatin (CDDP), a gold standard drug in osteosarcoma treatment, were compared. In order to overcome clinical confounding factors, we evaluated both routes of drug administration in a mouse model of experimental osteosarcoma.
METHODS: We directly compared i.v. versus i.a. drug infusions of cisplatin (CDDP), in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model of metastatic osteosarcoma. We performed tumor monitoring using caliper and micro computed tomography and measured tumor perfusion using laser speckle contrast imaging. Histopathological changes were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin staining as well as immunohistochemistry (cleaved PARP-1, CD31, HIF-1α).
RESULTS: First, an effective concentration of 4 mg/kg i.a. CDDP was determined that significantly reduced primary tumor volume. We used this concentration of i.a. CDDP and compared it to infusions of i.v. CDDP. Systemic (i.v.) CDDP only showed minor suppression of tumor growth whereas local (i.a.) CDDP strongly inhibited tumor growth and destruction of cortical bone in the tumor-bearing hind limb. Inhibition of tumor growth was linked to a reduced blood perfusion and resulted in increased amounts of tumor necrosis after i.a. CDDP. After treatment with i.a. CDDP, remaining viable tumor tissue responded by increasing expression of HIF-1α. Side effects due to administration of CDDP were minor, showing no differences in kidney damage between i.v. and i.a. CDDP. However, increased epidermal apoptosis in the foot was an indirect marker for locally increased concentrations of CDDP.
CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate the great potential of local administration of cytotoxic chemotherapeutics, such as CDDP. Consequently, we provide a preclinical basis for a renewed interest in the clinical use of i.a. chemotherapy in osteosarcoma therapy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of bone. Its treatment relies on the administration of neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy combined with surgery. Alternative to common intravenous (i.v.) administration of chemotherapeutic drugs, clinical studies also evaluated the benefit of intraarterial (i.a.) administrations. However, conflicting results were obtained when both routes of administration of cisplatin (CDDP), a gold standard drug in osteosarcoma treatment, were compared. In order to overcome clinical confounding factors, we evaluated both routes of drug administration in a mouse model of experimental osteosarcoma.
METHODS: We directly compared i.v. versus i.a. drug infusions of cisplatin (CDDP), in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model of metastatic osteosarcoma. We performed tumor monitoring using caliper and micro computed tomography and measured tumor perfusion using laser speckle contrast imaging. Histopathological changes were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin staining as well as immunohistochemistry (cleaved PARP-1, CD31, HIF-1α).
RESULTS: First, an effective concentration of 4 mg/kg i.a. CDDP was determined that significantly reduced primary tumor volume. We used this concentration of i.a. CDDP and compared it to infusions of i.v. CDDP. Systemic (i.v.) CDDP only showed minor suppression of tumor growth whereas local (i.a.) CDDP strongly inhibited tumor growth and destruction of cortical bone in the tumor-bearing hind limb. Inhibition of tumor growth was linked to a reduced blood perfusion and resulted in increased amounts of tumor necrosis after i.a. CDDP. After treatment with i.a. CDDP, remaining viable tumor tissue responded by increasing expression of HIF-1α. Side effects due to administration of CDDP were minor, showing no differences in kidney damage between i.v. and i.a. CDDP. However, increased epidermal apoptosis in the foot was an indirect marker for locally increased concentrations of CDDP.
CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate the great potential of local administration of cytotoxic chemotherapeutics, such as CDDP. Consequently, we provide a preclinical basis for a renewed interest in the clinical use of i.a. chemotherapy in osteosarcoma therapy.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Intraarterial, Cisplatin, Osteosarcoma, Intravenous, Metastasis
Language:English
Date:16 July 2016
Deposited On:15 Feb 2017 12:18
Last Modified:04 Aug 2017 18:50
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1756-9966
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s13046-016-0392-1
PubMed ID:27421768

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