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Exhaled nitric oxide distinguishes between subgroups of preschool children with respiratory symptoms


Moeller, A; Diefenbacher, C; Lehmann, A; Rochat, M; Brooks-Wildhaber, J; Hall, G L; Wildhaber, J H (2008). Exhaled nitric oxide distinguishes between subgroups of preschool children with respiratory symptoms. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 121(3):705-709.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Respiratory symptoms are common in early childhood. The clinical characterization of disease presentation and hence its likely disease progression has so far been proven difficult. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether exhaled nitric oxide (NO) could be helpful to distinguish between subgroups of nonwheezy and wheezy young children less than 4 years of age. METHODS: Exhaled NO was measured in 391 children (age 3-47 months) with nonwheezy and wheezy respiratory symptoms. Children were divided into 3 groups: children with recurrent cough but no history of wheeze (group 1), with early recurrent wheeze and a loose index for the prediction of asthma at school age (group 2), and with frequent recurrent wheeze and a stringent index for the prediction of asthma at school age (group 3). RESULTS: Children from group 3 showed significantly higher median (interquartile range) fractional exhaled NO (FeNO) levels (11.7 [11.85]) than children from groups 1 (6.5 [5.5]; P < .001) and 2 (6.4 [6.5]; P < .001). No difference in FeNO levels was found between children from groups 1 and 2 (P = .91). CONCLUSION: Wheezy young children less than 4 years of age with a stringent index for the prediction of asthma at school age have elevated levels of FeNO compared with children with recurrent wheeze and a loose index for the prediction of asthma at school age or children with recurrent cough.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Respiratory symptoms are common in early childhood. The clinical characterization of disease presentation and hence its likely disease progression has so far been proven difficult. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether exhaled nitric oxide (NO) could be helpful to distinguish between subgroups of nonwheezy and wheezy young children less than 4 years of age. METHODS: Exhaled NO was measured in 391 children (age 3-47 months) with nonwheezy and wheezy respiratory symptoms. Children were divided into 3 groups: children with recurrent cough but no history of wheeze (group 1), with early recurrent wheeze and a loose index for the prediction of asthma at school age (group 2), and with frequent recurrent wheeze and a stringent index for the prediction of asthma at school age (group 3). RESULTS: Children from group 3 showed significantly higher median (interquartile range) fractional exhaled NO (FeNO) levels (11.7 [11.85]) than children from groups 1 (6.5 [5.5]; P < .001) and 2 (6.4 [6.5]; P < .001). No difference in FeNO levels was found between children from groups 1 and 2 (P = .91). CONCLUSION: Wheezy young children less than 4 years of age with a stringent index for the prediction of asthma at school age have elevated levels of FeNO compared with children with recurrent wheeze and a loose index for the prediction of asthma at school age or children with recurrent cough.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:04 Mar 2009 16:22
Last Modified:27 Jan 2017 13:00
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0091-6749
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2007.11.008
PubMed ID:18177695

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