Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Arthroscopic hip surgery: frequency of postoperative mr arthrographic findings in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients


Kim, Chan-Hi Olaf; Dietrich, Tobias J; Zingg, Patrick O; Dora, Claudio; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Sutter, Reto (2017). Arthroscopic hip surgery: frequency of postoperative mr arthrographic findings in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Radiology, 283(3):779-788.

Abstract

Purpose To determine and compare the frequency of imaging abnormalities in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients after arthroscopic hip surgery. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. Thirty-four patients (17 asymptomatic and 17 symptomatic patients) underwent 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography of the hip 1 year after arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Two readers independently analyzed all MR arthrographic images for the presence of abnormal imaging findings, including capsular adhesions at the femoral neck, obliteration of the paralabral sulcus, labral defects, and defects of the hip capsule in several anatomic positions (anterior to posterior). Postoperative findings were compared with linear and generalized linear mixed-effects regression models. Results Capsular adhesions at the anterior femoral neck were present in 12 of the 34 patients (35%), and there were no differences between the groups or readers (P = .99). The paralabral sulcus was obliterated in at least one anatomic location in 94% (reader 1, 32 of 34 patients) and 100% (reader 2, 34 of 34 patients) of patients (P = .99). Residual labral tears were detected in 35% of asymptomatic patients (six of 17 patients) and 41% of symptomatic patients (seven of 17 patients) by reader 1 and in 53% of asymptomatic and symptomatic patients (nine of 17 patients in each group) by reader 2, without significant differences between the groups (P = .81). Defects of the hip capsule were more common in asymptomatic patients (77% [13 of 17 patients] for reader 1 and 53% [nine of 17 patients] for reader 2) than in symptomatic patients (59% [10 of 17 patients] for reader 1 and 47% [eight of 17 patients] for reader 2), but without significant differences (P = .33). Conclusion Obliteration of the paralabral sulcus was the most frequent finding after arthroscopic hip surgery in both asymptomatic and symptomatic patients, and capsular adhesions at the anterior femoral neck were present in 35% of patients in both groups. (©) RSNA, 2016.

Abstract

Purpose To determine and compare the frequency of imaging abnormalities in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients after arthroscopic hip surgery. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. Thirty-four patients (17 asymptomatic and 17 symptomatic patients) underwent 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography of the hip 1 year after arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Two readers independently analyzed all MR arthrographic images for the presence of abnormal imaging findings, including capsular adhesions at the femoral neck, obliteration of the paralabral sulcus, labral defects, and defects of the hip capsule in several anatomic positions (anterior to posterior). Postoperative findings were compared with linear and generalized linear mixed-effects regression models. Results Capsular adhesions at the anterior femoral neck were present in 12 of the 34 patients (35%), and there were no differences between the groups or readers (P = .99). The paralabral sulcus was obliterated in at least one anatomic location in 94% (reader 1, 32 of 34 patients) and 100% (reader 2, 34 of 34 patients) of patients (P = .99). Residual labral tears were detected in 35% of asymptomatic patients (six of 17 patients) and 41% of symptomatic patients (seven of 17 patients) by reader 1 and in 53% of asymptomatic and symptomatic patients (nine of 17 patients in each group) by reader 2, without significant differences between the groups (P = .81). Defects of the hip capsule were more common in asymptomatic patients (77% [13 of 17 patients] for reader 1 and 53% [nine of 17 patients] for reader 2) than in symptomatic patients (59% [10 of 17 patients] for reader 1 and 47% [eight of 17 patients] for reader 2), but without significant differences (P = .33). Conclusion Obliteration of the paralabral sulcus was the most frequent finding after arthroscopic hip surgery in both asymptomatic and symptomatic patients, and capsular adhesions at the anterior femoral neck were present in 35% of patients in both groups. (©) RSNA, 2016.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 16 Feb 2017
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:16 Feb 2017 13:59
Last Modified:18 May 2017 01:02
Publisher:Radiological Society of North America
ISSN:0033-8419
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2016161078
PubMed ID:27930091

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only until 12 October 2017
Size: 6MB
View at publisher
Embargo till: 2017-10-12

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations