Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Respiratory muscle endurance training reduces chronic neck pain: A pilot study


Wirth, B; Ferreira, T Duarte; Mittelholzer, M; Humphreys, B K; Boutellier, U (2016). Respiratory muscle endurance training reduces chronic neck pain: A pilot study. Journal of back and musculoskeletal rehabilitation, 29(4):825-834.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic neck pain show also respiratory dysfunctions.
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET) on chronic neck pain.
METHODS: In this pilot study (single-subject design: 3 baseline measurements, 4 measurements during RMET), 15 neck patients (49.3 ± 13.7 years; 13 females) conducted 20 sessions of home-based RMET using a SpiroTiger® (normocapnic hyperpnoea). Maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV), maximal inspiratory (Pimax) and expiratory (Pemax) pressure were measured before and after RMET. Neck flexor endurance, cervical and thoracic mobility, forward head posture, chest wall expansion and self-assessed neck disability [Neck Disability Index (NDI), Bournemouth questionnaire] were weekly assessed. Repeated measure ANOVA (Bonferroni correction) compared the first and last baseline and the last measurement after RMET.
RESULTS: RMET significantly increased MVV (p= 0.025), Pimax (p= 0.001) and Pemax (p< 0.001). During RMET, neck disability significantly decreased (NDI: p= 0.001; Bournemouth questionnaire: p= 0.002), while neck flexor endurance (p< 0.001) and chest wall expansion (p< 0.001) increased. The changes in respiratory and musculoskeletal parameters did not correlate.
CONCLUSIONS: RMET emerged from this pilot study as a feasible and effective therapy for reducing disability in patients with chronic neck pain. The underlying mechanisms, including blood gas analyses, need further investigation in a randomized controlled study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic neck pain show also respiratory dysfunctions.
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET) on chronic neck pain.
METHODS: In this pilot study (single-subject design: 3 baseline measurements, 4 measurements during RMET), 15 neck patients (49.3 ± 13.7 years; 13 females) conducted 20 sessions of home-based RMET using a SpiroTiger® (normocapnic hyperpnoea). Maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV), maximal inspiratory (Pimax) and expiratory (Pemax) pressure were measured before and after RMET. Neck flexor endurance, cervical and thoracic mobility, forward head posture, chest wall expansion and self-assessed neck disability [Neck Disability Index (NDI), Bournemouth questionnaire] were weekly assessed. Repeated measure ANOVA (Bonferroni correction) compared the first and last baseline and the last measurement after RMET.
RESULTS: RMET significantly increased MVV (p= 0.025), Pimax (p= 0.001) and Pemax (p< 0.001). During RMET, neck disability significantly decreased (NDI: p= 0.001; Bournemouth questionnaire: p= 0.002), while neck flexor endurance (p< 0.001) and chest wall expansion (p< 0.001) increased. The changes in respiratory and musculoskeletal parameters did not correlate.
CONCLUSIONS: RMET emerged from this pilot study as a feasible and effective therapy for reducing disability in patients with chronic neck pain. The underlying mechanisms, including blood gas analyses, need further investigation in a randomized controlled study.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:21 November 2016
Deposited On:17 Feb 2017 11:28
Last Modified:17 Feb 2017 11:38
Publisher:I O S Press
ISSN:1053-8127
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3233/BMR-160695
PubMed ID:27002668

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations