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Exploring the definition of acute low back pain: a prospective observational cohort study comparing outcomes of chiropractic patients with 0-2, 2-4, and 4-12 weeks of symptoms


Mantel, Karin E; Peterson, Cynthia K; Humphreys, B Kim (2016). Exploring the definition of acute low back pain: a prospective observational cohort study comparing outcomes of chiropractic patients with 0-2, 2-4, and 4-12 weeks of symptoms. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 39(3):141-149.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare improvement rates in patients with low back pain (LBP) undergoing chiropractic treatment with 0-2 weeks vs 2-4 and 4-12 weeks of symptoms.
METHODS: This was a prospective cohort outcome study with 1-year follow-up including adult acute (symptoms 0-4 weeks) LBP patients. The numerical rating scale for pain (NRS) and Oswestry questionnaire were completed at baseline, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after starting treatment. The Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) scale was completed at all follow-up time points. At 6 months and 1 year, NRS and PGIC data were collected. The proportion of patients reporting relevant "improvement" (PGIC scale) was compared between patients having 0-2 and 2-4 weeks of symptoms using the χ(2) test at all data collection time points. The unpaired t test compared NRS and Oswestry change scores between these 2 groups.
RESULTS: Patients with 0-2 weeks of symptoms were significantly more likely to "improve" at 1 week, 1 month, and 6 months compared with those with 2-4 weeks of symptoms (P < .015). Patients with 0-2 weeks of symptoms reported significantly higher NRS and Oswestry change scores at all data collection time points. Outcomes for patients with 2-4 weeks of symptoms were similar to patients having 4-12 weeks of symptoms.
CONCLUSION: The time period 0-4 weeks as the definition of "acute" should be challenged. Patients with 2-4 weeks of symptoms had outcomes similar to patients with subacute (4-12 weeks) symptoms and not with patients reporting 0-2 weeks of symptoms.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare improvement rates in patients with low back pain (LBP) undergoing chiropractic treatment with 0-2 weeks vs 2-4 and 4-12 weeks of symptoms.
METHODS: This was a prospective cohort outcome study with 1-year follow-up including adult acute (symptoms 0-4 weeks) LBP patients. The numerical rating scale for pain (NRS) and Oswestry questionnaire were completed at baseline, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after starting treatment. The Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) scale was completed at all follow-up time points. At 6 months and 1 year, NRS and PGIC data were collected. The proportion of patients reporting relevant "improvement" (PGIC scale) was compared between patients having 0-2 and 2-4 weeks of symptoms using the χ(2) test at all data collection time points. The unpaired t test compared NRS and Oswestry change scores between these 2 groups.
RESULTS: Patients with 0-2 weeks of symptoms were significantly more likely to "improve" at 1 week, 1 month, and 6 months compared with those with 2-4 weeks of symptoms (P < .015). Patients with 0-2 weeks of symptoms reported significantly higher NRS and Oswestry change scores at all data collection time points. Outcomes for patients with 2-4 weeks of symptoms were similar to patients having 4-12 weeks of symptoms.
CONCLUSION: The time period 0-4 weeks as the definition of "acute" should be challenged. Patients with 2-4 weeks of symptoms had outcomes similar to patients with subacute (4-12 weeks) symptoms and not with patients reporting 0-2 weeks of symptoms.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:28 March 2016
Deposited On:17 Feb 2017 11:22
Last Modified:18 Feb 2017 08:45
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0161-4754
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmpt.2016.02.005
PubMed ID:27034105

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