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Ligature-induced peri-implantitis in minipigs revisited


Stübinger, Stefan; Bucher, Ramon; Kronen, Peter W; Schlottig, Falko; von Rechenberg, Brigitte (2016). Ligature-induced peri-implantitis in minipigs revisited. Periodontics and prosthodontics, 2(1):online.

Abstract

Aim: The ligature-induced defect model still remains the model of first choice to experimentally investigate the cause, effect and treatment approaches of periimplantitis. It was the aim of the present in-vivo trail to revisit the ligature-induced peri-implantitis minipig model regarding its current scientific value and ethical justification in implant research.
Materials and methods: Six minipigs were used for the analysis of peri-implant hard and soft tissue structures. Animals were randomly allocated to an experimental silk ligature-induced peri-implantitis group (n=4 animals) and a reference healthy group (n=2 animals). After six weeks mean pocket depths (PD) and bleeding on probing (BOP) measurements were performed just before animals were sacrificed.
Results: Overall, ligature-induced peri-implantitis provoked a local inflammation around the experimental implants. Additionally, a loss of crestal bone surrounding the implants could be detected. Mean pocket depths (PD) were 2.2 ± 1.1 mm for healthy animals and 5.4 ± 1.9 mm for peri-implantitis sites. Healthy sites showed a BOP of 60%, whereas peri-implantitis sites disclosed a BOP of 90% within 10 s after probing.
Conclusion: Clinical, radiological and histological findings of the present animal experiment supported the overall applicability of the ligature-induced periimplantitis minipig model. A rapid breakdown of peri-implant hard tissues could be detected mainly on the buccal side.

Abstract

Aim: The ligature-induced defect model still remains the model of first choice to experimentally investigate the cause, effect and treatment approaches of periimplantitis. It was the aim of the present in-vivo trail to revisit the ligature-induced peri-implantitis minipig model regarding its current scientific value and ethical justification in implant research.
Materials and methods: Six minipigs were used for the analysis of peri-implant hard and soft tissue structures. Animals were randomly allocated to an experimental silk ligature-induced peri-implantitis group (n=4 animals) and a reference healthy group (n=2 animals). After six weeks mean pocket depths (PD) and bleeding on probing (BOP) measurements were performed just before animals were sacrificed.
Results: Overall, ligature-induced peri-implantitis provoked a local inflammation around the experimental implants. Additionally, a loss of crestal bone surrounding the implants could be detected. Mean pocket depths (PD) were 2.2 ± 1.1 mm for healthy animals and 5.4 ± 1.9 mm for peri-implantitis sites. Healthy sites showed a BOP of 60%, whereas peri-implantitis sites disclosed a BOP of 90% within 10 s after probing.
Conclusion: Clinical, radiological and histological findings of the present animal experiment supported the overall applicability of the ligature-induced periimplantitis minipig model. A rapid breakdown of peri-implant hard tissues could be detected mainly on the buccal side.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Center for Applied Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:15 Feb 2017 10:25
Last Modified:21 Mar 2017 14:21
Publisher:Insight Medical Publishing
ISSN:2471-3082
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.21767/2471-3082.100008

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