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Helicobacter pylori and Extragastric Diseases


Kyburz, Andreas; Müller, Anne (2017). Helicobacter pylori and Extragastric Diseases. In: Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Backert, Steffen. Molecular Pathogenesis and Signal Transduction by Helicobacter pylori. Springer International Publishing: Springer, 325-347.

Abstract

The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori is predominantly known for its tight association with peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer development. However, recent epidemiological and experimental evidence suggests that chronic infection with H. pylori may at the same time be beneficial to the host by conferring protection against gastroesophageal diseases, asthma, other allergic disease manifestations and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In this chapter, we summarize the epidemiological data that are available to date to support or refute a possible inverse correlation of H. pylori infection with various extragastric diseases. We further examine and discuss the experimental evidence, generated mostly in mouse models of allergic diseases and IBD, showing that these disorders fail to develop in the presence of H. pylori. The proposed mechanisms of the protective effects of H. pylori, which appear to involve the induction of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) with highly suppressive activity, are presented and explained.

Abstract

The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori is predominantly known for its tight association with peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer development. However, recent epidemiological and experimental evidence suggests that chronic infection with H. pylori may at the same time be beneficial to the host by conferring protection against gastroesophageal diseases, asthma, other allergic disease manifestations and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In this chapter, we summarize the epidemiological data that are available to date to support or refute a possible inverse correlation of H. pylori infection with various extragastric diseases. We further examine and discuss the experimental evidence, generated mostly in mouse models of allergic diseases and IBD, showing that these disorders fail to develop in the presence of H. pylori. The proposed mechanisms of the protective effects of H. pylori, which appear to involve the induction of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) with highly suppressive activity, are presented and explained.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:17 Feb 2017 09:35
Last Modified:19 Feb 2018 07:43
Publisher:Springer
Series Name:Current topics in microbiology and immunology
ISSN:0070-217X
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-50520-6_14
PubMed ID:28124160

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