Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Modeling the effect of tilting, passive leg exercise, and functional electrical stimulation on the human cardiovascular system


Sarabadani Tafreshi, Amirehsan; Okle, Jan; Klamroth-Marganska, Verena; Riener, Robert (2017). Modeling the effect of tilting, passive leg exercise, and functional electrical stimulation on the human cardiovascular system. Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

Long periods of bed rest negatively affect the human body organs, notably the cardiovascular system. To avert these negative effects and promote functional recovery in patients dealing with prolonged bed rest, the goal is to mobilize them as early as possible while controlling and stabilizing their cardiovascular system. A robotic tilt table allows early mobilization by modulating body inclination, automated passive leg exercise, and the intensity of functional electrical stimulation applied to leg muscles (inputs). These inputs are used to control the cardiovascular variables heart rate (HR), and systolic and diastolic blood pressures (sBP, dBP) (outputs). To enhance the design of the closed-loop cardiovascular biofeedback controller, we investigated a subject-specific multi-input multi-output (MIMO) black-box model describing the relationship between the inputs and outputs. For identification of the linear part of the system, two popular linear model structures-the autoregressive model with exogenous input and the output error model-are examined and compared. The estimation algorithm is tested in simulation and then used in four study protocols with ten healthy participants to estimate transfer functions of HR, sBP and dBP to the inputs. The results show that only the HR transfer functions to inclination input can explain the variance in the data to a reasonable extent (on average 69.8%). As in the other input types, the responses are nonlinear; the models are either not reliable or explain only a negligible amount of the observed variance. Analysis of both, the nonlinearities and the occasionally occurring zero-crossings, is necessary before designing an appropriate MIMO controller for mobilization of bedridden patients.

Abstract

Long periods of bed rest negatively affect the human body organs, notably the cardiovascular system. To avert these negative effects and promote functional recovery in patients dealing with prolonged bed rest, the goal is to mobilize them as early as possible while controlling and stabilizing their cardiovascular system. A robotic tilt table allows early mobilization by modulating body inclination, automated passive leg exercise, and the intensity of functional electrical stimulation applied to leg muscles (inputs). These inputs are used to control the cardiovascular variables heart rate (HR), and systolic and diastolic blood pressures (sBP, dBP) (outputs). To enhance the design of the closed-loop cardiovascular biofeedback controller, we investigated a subject-specific multi-input multi-output (MIMO) black-box model describing the relationship between the inputs and outputs. For identification of the linear part of the system, two popular linear model structures-the autoregressive model with exogenous input and the output error model-are examined and compared. The estimation algorithm is tested in simulation and then used in four study protocols with ten healthy participants to estimate transfer functions of HR, sBP and dBP to the inputs. The results show that only the HR transfer functions to inclination input can explain the variance in the data to a reasonable extent (on average 69.8%). As in the other input types, the responses are nonlinear; the models are either not reliable or explain only a negligible amount of the observed variance. Analysis of both, the nonlinearities and the occasionally occurring zero-crossings, is necessary before designing an appropriate MIMO controller for mobilization of bedridden patients.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:10 February 2017
Deposited On:23 Feb 2017 12:09
Last Modified:31 May 2017 07:35
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0140-0118
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11517-017-1628-8
PubMed ID:28188470

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations