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Analyzing Dyadic Data Using Grid-Sequence Analysis: Interdyad Differences in Intradyad Dynamics


Brinberg, Miriam; Ram, Nilam; Hülür, Gizem; Brick, Timothy R; Gerstorf, Denis (2017). Analyzing Dyadic Data Using Grid-Sequence Analysis: Interdyad Differences in Intradyad Dynamics. Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Spouses are proximal contexts for and influence each other's behaviors, particularly in old age. In this article, we forward an integrated approach that merges state space grid methods adapted from the dynamic systems literature with sequence analysis methods adapted from molecular biology into a "grid-sequence" method for studying interdyad differences in intradyad dynamics.

METHOD: Using dyadic data from 108 older couples (MAge = 75.18 years) with six within-day emotion and activity reports over 7 days, we illustrate how grid-sequence analysis can be used to identify a taxonomy of dyads with different emotion dynamics.

RESULTS: Results provide a basis for measuring a set of dyad-level variables that capture dynamic equilibrium, daily routines, and interdyad differences. Specifically, we identified four groups of dyads who differed in how their moment-to-moment happiness was organized, with some evidence that these patterns were related to dyad-level differences in agreement on amount of time spent with partner and in subjective health.

DISCUSSION: Methodologically, grid-sequence analysis extends the toolbox of techniques for analysis of dyadic experience sampling data. Substantively, we identify patterns of dyad-level microdynamics that may serve as new markers of risk/protective factors and potential points for intervention in older adults' proximal context.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Spouses are proximal contexts for and influence each other's behaviors, particularly in old age. In this article, we forward an integrated approach that merges state space grid methods adapted from the dynamic systems literature with sequence analysis methods adapted from molecular biology into a "grid-sequence" method for studying interdyad differences in intradyad dynamics.

METHOD: Using dyadic data from 108 older couples (MAge = 75.18 years) with six within-day emotion and activity reports over 7 days, we illustrate how grid-sequence analysis can be used to identify a taxonomy of dyads with different emotion dynamics.

RESULTS: Results provide a basis for measuring a set of dyad-level variables that capture dynamic equilibrium, daily routines, and interdyad differences. Specifically, we identified four groups of dyads who differed in how their moment-to-moment happiness was organized, with some evidence that these patterns were related to dyad-level differences in agreement on amount of time spent with partner and in subjective health.

DISCUSSION: Methodologically, grid-sequence analysis extends the toolbox of techniques for analysis of dyadic experience sampling data. Substantively, we identify patterns of dyad-level microdynamics that may serve as new markers of risk/protective factors and potential points for intervention in older adults' proximal context.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
08 University Research Priority Programs > Dynamics of Healthy Aging
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:29 December 2017
Deposited On:03 Mar 2017 10:12
Last Modified:03 Jun 2017 13:08
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1079-5014
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbw160
PubMed ID:28034903

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