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Age and sex affect intersubject correlation of EEG throught development


Petroni, Augustin; Cohen, Samantha; Langer, Nicolas; Henin, Simon; Vanderwal, Tamara; Milham, Michael P; Parra, Lucas C (2016). Age and sex affect intersubject correlation of EEG throught development. bioRxiv:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

Recent efforts have aimed to characterize clinical pediatric populations by using neurophysiological tests in addition to behavioral assays. Here we report on a data collection effort in which electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded in both juveniles and adults (N=114 participants, ages 6-44 years of age) during various stimulation protocols. The present analysis focuses on how neural responses during passive viewing of naturalistic videos vary with age and sex, and in particular, how similar they are within developmental groups. Similarity of neural responses was measured as the inter-subject correlation of the EEG. Stimulus-evoked neural responses are more similar among children and decrease in similarity with age. Among children, males respond more similarly to each other than females. This was uniformly true for a variety of videos. The decrease in group similarity with age may result from an overall decline in the magnitude of evoked responses, but this cannot explain the sex differences found in the young. We therefore propose that as children mature, neural function may become more variable.

Abstract

Recent efforts have aimed to characterize clinical pediatric populations by using neurophysiological tests in addition to behavioral assays. Here we report on a data collection effort in which electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded in both juveniles and adults (N=114 participants, ages 6-44 years of age) during various stimulation protocols. The present analysis focuses on how neural responses during passive viewing of naturalistic videos vary with age and sex, and in particular, how similar they are within developmental groups. Similarity of neural responses was measured as the inter-subject correlation of the EEG. Stimulus-evoked neural responses are more similar among children and decrease in similarity with age. Among children, males respond more similarly to each other than females. This was uniformly true for a variety of videos. The decrease in group similarity with age may result from an overall decline in the magnitude of evoked responses, but this cannot explain the sex differences found in the young. We therefore propose that as children mature, neural function may become more variable.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:22 November 2016
Deposited On:10 Mar 2017 11:40
Last Modified:10 Mar 2017 11:40
Publisher:Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/doi.org/10.1101/089060
Official URL:http://biorxiv.org/content/early/2016/11/22/089060

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Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

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