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Repeated sprint training in hypoxia versus normoxia does not improve performance: a double-blind and cross-over study


Montero, David; Lundby, Carsten (2017). Repeated sprint training in hypoxia versus normoxia does not improve performance: a double-blind and cross-over study. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 12(2):161-167.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Few recent studies indicate that short-term repeated sprint training in hypoxia (RSH) improves repeated sprint (RS) performance compared with identical training under normoxic conditions (RSN) in endurance-trained subjects. Herein, we sought to determine the effects of RSH against RSN on RS performance under normoxic and moderate hypoxic conditions, using a randomized, double-blind and cross-over experimental design.
METHODS: Fifteen endurance-trained male subjects (age=25±4 years) performed 4 weeks of RS training (3 sessions/week) in normobaric hypoxia (RSH, FiO2=13.8 %) and normoxia (RSN, FiO2=20.9 %) in a cross-over manner. Prior to and after completion of training, RS tests were performed on a cycle ergometer (i) with no prior exercise (RSNE), (ii) after an incremental exercise test (RSIE) and (iii) after a time trial test (RSTT), in normoxia and hypoxia.
RESULTS: Peak power output at the incremental exercise test and time trial performance were unaltered by RSH in normoxia and hypoxia. RS performance was generally enhanced by RSH as well as RSN, but there were no additional effects of RSH over RSN on peak and mean sprint power output and the number of repeated sprints performed in the RSNE, RSIE and RSTT trials under normoxic and hypoxic conditions.
CONCLUSIONS: The present double-blind cross-over study indicates that RSH does not improve RS performance compared with RSN in normoxic and hypoxic conditions in endurance-trained subjects. Therefore, caution should be exercised when proposing RSH as an advantageous method to improve exercise performance.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Few recent studies indicate that short-term repeated sprint training in hypoxia (RSH) improves repeated sprint (RS) performance compared with identical training under normoxic conditions (RSN) in endurance-trained subjects. Herein, we sought to determine the effects of RSH against RSN on RS performance under normoxic and moderate hypoxic conditions, using a randomized, double-blind and cross-over experimental design.
METHODS: Fifteen endurance-trained male subjects (age=25±4 years) performed 4 weeks of RS training (3 sessions/week) in normobaric hypoxia (RSH, FiO2=13.8 %) and normoxia (RSN, FiO2=20.9 %) in a cross-over manner. Prior to and after completion of training, RS tests were performed on a cycle ergometer (i) with no prior exercise (RSNE), (ii) after an incremental exercise test (RSIE) and (iii) after a time trial test (RSTT), in normoxia and hypoxia.
RESULTS: Peak power output at the incremental exercise test and time trial performance were unaltered by RSH in normoxia and hypoxia. RS performance was generally enhanced by RSH as well as RSN, but there were no additional effects of RSH over RSN on peak and mean sprint power output and the number of repeated sprints performed in the RSNE, RSIE and RSTT trials under normoxic and hypoxic conditions.
CONCLUSIONS: The present double-blind cross-over study indicates that RSH does not improve RS performance compared with RSN in normoxic and hypoxic conditions in endurance-trained subjects. Therefore, caution should be exercised when proposing RSH as an advantageous method to improve exercise performance.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:15 Mar 2017 11:43
Last Modified:07 Apr 2017 01:04
Publisher:Human Kinetics
ISSN:1555-0265
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2015-0691
PubMed ID:27140941

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